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Four Loyola physicians named to Who's Who in Hispanic Chicago

July 15, 2016

MAYWOOD, IL - Four Loyola Medicine physicians have been named to Negocios Now's 2016 "Who's Who in Hispanic Chicago."

Loyola has more physicians on the list than any other medical center.

Negocios Now, a national award-winning business publication, develops a list each year of the most prominent Hispanics in the Chicago area. Nominees come from sectors including business, healthcare, media, nonprofit, education, culture and politics.

The 2016 Who's Who list was announced at a July 8 gala at the Chicago Cultural Center and published in a Negocios Now Who's Who in Hispanic Chicago special edition. Loyola representatives on the Who's Who list are:

José Biller, MD. Dr. Biller is an internationally known expert in stroke and other neurological disorders. He has published hundreds of peer-reviewed articles in medical journals, edited two dozen books, written more than 130 book chapters and given more than 600 lectures around the world. His specialties include stroke, general neurology, aneurysms, brain hemorrhage and vascular neurology. Dr. Biller is chair of Loyola's department of neurology.

Diego di Sabato, MD. Dr. di Sabato has specialized in surgery for more than 15 years, focusing on liver, kidney, and pancreas transplantation, with a special interest in living-donor liver transplantation. Dr. di Sabato has been a frequent guest on Chicago affiliates of Univisión and Telemundo. Dr. di Sabato is a Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine assistant professor in the department of surgery.

Camilo Gomez, MD. Dr. Gomez is a stroke specialist and pioneer in minimally invasive neurosurgery, and medical director of neuroendovascular surgery. Neuroendovascular surgery is much less invasive than traditional open surgery. Dr. Gomez is among the first neurologists to practice this subspecialty in the United States. Dr. Gomez introduced the hospital term "Code Stroke" for the immediate summoning of specialists to the patient's bedside. He also is credited with coining the nationally used expression "time is brain" to communicate the message to call 911 immediately in case of a stroke. Dr. Gomez is a professor in the department of neurology.

Tulio Rodriguez, MD. As medical director of bone marrow transplantation, Dr. Rodriguez oversees a center that has treated more patients with bone marrow transplants than any other center in Illinois and has one of the largest unrelated donor transplant programs in the world. Dr. Rodriguez treats blood disorders, leukemia, multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Dr. Rodriguez is a professor in the division of hematology/oncology.

Omar Duque, a board member of Loyola University Health System and president and CEO of the Illinois Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, also was named to Who's Who in Hispanic Chicago.
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Loyola University Health System

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