Lower than expected risk of bone density decline with Truvada PrEP

July 15, 2019

New Rochelle, NY, July 15, 2019--Researchers have shown that among users of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent against AIDS that includes tenofovir (Truvada), those with daily use - very high adherence - had only about a 1% average decrease in bone mineral density in the spine and a 0.5% decline in the hip. The study findings and the implications for the lower than expected results on the potential for broader use of Truvada in PrEP and in AIDS treatment are explored in an article published in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the full-text article free on the AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses website through August 15, 2019.

Matthew Spinelli, University of California, San Francisco and a large team of researchers coauthored the article entitled "Impact of Estimated Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Adherence Patterns on Bone Mineral Density in a Large PrEP Demonstration Project." Declines in bone mineral density with regular tenofovir use are an ongoing concern and may be limiting PrEP. The researchers in this study used estimated PrEP adherence data and measurements of bone density using X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The data were gathered over a median of 24 weeks.

Thomas Hope, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses and Professor of Cell and Molecular Biology at Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL states: "Correct use of Truvada-based PrEP has been shown to significantly protect individuals from HIV acquisition. However, previous studies in individuals using Truvada for treatment raised possible concerns about decreases in bone density. Such concerns could decrease the number of individuals using PrEP. In the study presented here, only minor changes in bone density were observed indicating that young healthy individuals using Truvada for PrEP have only a minimal risk of decreased bone density and increased fractures. However, individuals at highest risk for fracture may consider alternative PrEP formulations such as DESCOVY® (TAF/FTC). This new knowledge should facilitate increased PrEP utilization in high risk populations."
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Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institutes of Health under Award Numbers 5T32AI060530, R03AI122908, R03AI120819, R01AI143340, R01AI098472, U01AI106499, U01AI084735, and R01AI118575. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

About the Journal

AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, published monthly online with open access options and in print, presents papers, reviews, and case studies documenting the latest developments and research advances in the molecular biology of HIV and SIV and innovative approaches to HIV vaccine and therapeutic drug research, including the development of antiretroviral agents and immune-restorative therapies. Content also explores the molecular and cellular basis of HIV pathogenesis and HIV/HTLV epidemiology. The Journal features rapid publication of emerging sequence information, reports on clinical trials of emerging HIV therapies, and images in HIV research. Tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including AIDS Patient Care and STDs, Viral Immunology, and Journal of Interferon and Cytokine Research. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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