LINDSAY: The future of medical education

July 16, 2012

Researchers at the University of Calgary have created a new, interactive tool that will change the way medical education is taught.

LINDSAY, named after Dr. Lindsay Kimmett, a bright, promising medical student who died in a car crash, is a virtual human that uses a variety of touch interfaces to help students learn anatomy and physiology in 3D.

"There's a real gap between textbook anatomy and what students see in real life - the LINDSAY software connects the dots between the classroom and real life," says Heather Jamniczky, assistant professor in the Faculty of Medicine who uses the software to teach classes.

"Students have been really enthusiastic and it seems to improve their ability to make the connections we are asking. It pulls everything in and provides a much more engaging learning experience."

The project is a collaboration between the faculties of Medicine and Science and can be customized to whatever lesson students are being taught.

"It's sort of the medical equivalent to a flight simulator," says Professor Christian Jacob of the Faculty of Science, whose team helped design the software. "Students can navigate - actually fly - through the body to see what is going on at different levels of scale, from inside a cell to a pumping heart."

Dr. Bruce Wright, associate dean of undergraduate medical education, says he hopes LINDSAY will revolutionize how teaching is done in the classroom. The software can be used on big screens as well as on other devices such as the iPad, iPhone and smartboards. Those who teach can also use another application called LINDSAY presenter to make 3D slides and soon, the software will become available to download as an app.

"In five years from now, I want LINDSAY to be a one-stop shop where students can learn all aspects of the anatomy and physiology," says Wright. "This isn't just a tool to be used in medical school. It's part of our vision to go beyond the practise of medicine and into other subjects. The software is dynamic and robust and can be set up anywhere learning needs to happen. In fact, a high-school biology class in Cochrane is using the software."

Lindsay's parents Dianne and Kelly Kimmett say they are thrilled with the project that has her name attached to it. "This is something that Lindsay would have loved," says Dianne Kimmett. "She would have been absolutely inspired by the 21 Century teaching tool it has become."
-end-
http://lindsayvirtualhuman.org/

University of Calgary

Related Medical Education Articles from Brightsurf:

How can education researchers support education and public health and institutions during COVID-19?
As education researchers' ongoing work is interrupted by school closures, what can they do to support education and public health institutions dealing with the Covid-19 pandemic?

Online education platforms could scale high-quality STEM education for universities
Online and blended (online and in-person) STEM instruction can produce the same learning outcomes for students as traditional, in-person classes at a fraction of the cost, finds research published today in Science Advances.

Teaming basic scientists with clinicians may improve medical education retention
There is a trend in modern medical school curriculum design to integrate the basic sciences and clinical sciences.

Medicare overpayments for graduate medical education could total $1.28 billion annually
If Medicare capped funds for Graduate Medical Education (GME) at the rate of $150,000 per resident, the move would free up more than $1 billion a year, according to a study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Gamification can give dental and medical education a boost
Introducing gamification to medical and dental education can boost student motivation and lead to better learning outcomes, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.

Flipped classroom enhances learning outcomes in medical certificate education
The quality of medical certificates written by students of medicine was better when they were taught by using the flipped classroom approach instead of traditional lecturing.

Most surgical residents want personal financial education offered during medical training
Close to 80 percent of resident respondents to one online survey said they think personal financial education is needed during residency, according to study findings in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

Centralized infrastructure facilitates medical education research
The Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance has enabled a large number of research teams to conduct meaningful scholarship with a fraction of the usual time and energy.

Individual education programs not being used as intended in special education
Gone are the days when students with disabilities were placed in a separate classroom, or even in a completely different part of the school.

Springer Healthcare launches Medicine Matters, a new medical education website
Springer Healthcare launches Medicine Matters, a new medical education website.

Read More: Medical Education News and Medical Education Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.