Nav: Home

Australian bee sting vaccine trial holds promise against allergic reactions

July 16, 2019

Most people have probably been stung by a bee and while it can be painful, it's especially dangerous for the many that are at risk of suffering a life threatening allergic reaction.

Australian researchers have successfully completed a human trial on a vaccine designed to eliminate the risk of a severe allergic reaction to European honeybee stings.

The clinical trial at Flinders University and the Royal Adelaide Hospital included 27 adults with a history of allergic reactions to bee stings.

The vaccine used in the trial contained a unique sugar-based ingredient called an adjuvant, developed in Australia, which is designed to help the body neutralise the bee venom at a faster rate.

Professor Nikolai Petrovsky says the adjuvant used to enhance the bee sting vaccines has now been successfully given to over a thousand individuals across a range of different vaccines including in the current bee sting allergy trial.

"Our technology is like adding a turbocharger to a car and in this case makes the bee allergy vaccine much more powerful, allowing the immune system to better neutralise the bee venom and prevent allergic symptoms," says Professor Petrovsky.

Associate Professor Robert Heddle, lead investigator in the trial, says the aim was to see if the Advax adjuvant would safely speed up and improve bee sting immunotherapy.

"The results of the study were very promising and confirmed the safety of this approach to improving bee sting immunotherapy."

Dr Anthony Smith, an investigator in the trial, says while a commercial bee venom therapy is already available, it requires patients to have over 50 injections over a 3 year period to build up their immune system.

"The current treatment option for serious bee venom allergies is lengthy and cumbersome, so I hope this enhanced bee venom therapy brings about faster, but longer lasting protection to bee stings for allergic individuals."

The Advax adjuvant which enhances the bee sting vaccines was developed in Adelaide by Vaxine Pty Ltd and has also been used to develop vaccines for seasonal and pandemic influenza, hepatitis, malaria, Alzheimers disease, cancer and other diseases.
-end-


Flinders University

Related Vaccine Articles:

Exposing vaccine hesitant to real-life pain of diseases makes them more pro-vaccine
New research from Brigham Young University professors finds there is a better way to help increase support for vaccinations: Expose people to the pain and suffering caused by vaccine-preventable diseases instead of trying to combat people with vaccine facts.
Lifetime flu vaccine?
Another year, another flu vaccine because so far scientists haven't managed to make a vaccine that protects against all strains of flu.
On the horizon: An acne vaccine
A new study published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology reports important steps that have been taken towards the development of an acne vaccine.
Study examines first birth cohort to receive HPV vaccine: The vaccine works
Girls in the first birth cohort to be offered and receive the HPV vaccine showed a lower degree of dysplasia which may eventually lead to cervical cancer than a birth cohort from 1983.
False beliefs about MMR vaccine found to influence acceptance of Zika vaccine
People's willingness to use a Zika vaccine, once it's available, will be influenced by how they weigh the risks associated with the disease and the vaccine, but also by their misconceptions about other vaccines.
Would you pay for an Ebola vaccine? Most say yes.
George Mason University researchers conducted a study during the height of the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic and found that a majority of participants (59.7 percent) would pay at least $1 for a vaccine.
How well will the flu vaccine work this winter?
Scientists from UTMB and Biomed Protection predicted which H3N2 variants would become 'vaccine resistant', and this prediction has been confirmed during the 2017 Australian flu season.
Virus-like particle vaccine protects against RSV vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease, study finds
Researchers have discovered that a virus-like particle vaccine can prime the body's immune response and prevent the severe respiratory disease that results when patients given an early form of a vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are exposed to RSV, according to a study led by Georgia State University.
Flu vaccine rates for kids may drop when the nasal spray vaccine is unavailable
Influenza vaccination rates in children may have decreased for the 2016-17 influenza season because of a recommendation by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that the nasal spray version of the vaccine not be used, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.
Development of a novel vaccine for Zika
Research presented by Farshad Guirakhoo, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, GeoVax, Inc., at the ASM Microbe 2017 meeting showed a new Zika virus vaccine that gives 100 percent protection in mice.
More Vaccine News and Vaccine Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

In & Out Of Love
We think of love as a mysterious, unknowable force. Something that happens to us. But what if we could control it? This hour, TED speakers on whether we can decide to fall in — and out of — love. Guests include writer Mandy Len Catron, biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, musician Dessa, One Love CEO Katie Hood, and psychologist Guy Winch.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#543 Give a Nerd a Gift
Yup, you guessed it... it's Science for the People's annual holiday episode that helps you figure out what sciency books and gifts to get that special nerd on your list. Or maybe you're looking to build up your reading list for the holiday break and a geeky Christmas sweater to wear to an upcoming party. Returning are pop-science power-readers John Dupuis and Joanne Manaster to dish on the best science books they read this past year. And Rachelle Saunders and Bethany Brookshire squee in delight over some truly delightful science-themed non-book objects for those whose bookshelves are already full. Since...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab