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Does ICU flexible family visitation policy reduce delirium among patients?

July 16, 2019

Bottom Line: A randomized clinical trial involving patients, family members and clinicians from 36 adult intensive care units in Brazil looked at whether flexible family visitation (up to 12 hours per day) plus family education on ICUs and delirium would reduce the occurrence of delirium compared to standard visitation of up to 4½ hours per day. The study included 1,685 patients. The authors report no significant difference in reducing the occurrence of delirium between flexible and standard visitation. Limitations of the study include that it was restricted to a single country.

Authors: Regis Goulart Rosa, M.D., Ph.D., Hospital Moinhos de Vento, Porto Alegre, Brazil, and coauthors

(doi:10.1001/jama.2019.8766)
-end-
Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

The full study and editorial are linked to this news release.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2738289?guestAccessKey=a70af635-d1dd-4843-964b-be0ed9d132fb&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=071619

JAMA

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