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Staging β-amyloid pathology with amyloid positron emission tomography

July 17, 2019

What The Study Did: This multicenter study used in vivo β-amyloid cerebrospinal fluid, a biomarker of Alzheimer disease, and positron emission tomography findings to track progression of Alzheimer disease over six years among study participants.

Authors: Niklas Mattsson, M.D., Ph.D., and Oskar Hansson, M.D., Ph.D., of Lund University in Malmo, Sweden, are the corresponding authors.

(doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2019.2214)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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Media Advisory: This article is being released to coincide with the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. The full study and related articles also being released to coincide with the event are linked to this news release.

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JAMA Neurology

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