Quadrennial joint annual meetings of American Society of Plant Biologists and Canadian Society of Plant Physiologists in Providence July 21-25 will present latest advances in plant science

July 18, 2001

PROVIDENCE, RI - Nearly 1,300 scientists will attend the Quadrennial Joint Annual Meetings of the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) and the Canadian Society of Plant Physiologists July 21 to 25, 2001 in the Rhode Island Convention Center in Providence. Abstracts and other annual meeting information can be found at http://www.aspb.org/meetings/pb-2001/index.cfm

Leading findings in plant research will be presented including in the following areas:

Metabolic Signaling and Gene Regulation

Signal Transduction Mechanisms in Plant Defense Activations

Gene Silencing

Intracellular Communication

Strategies & Mechanisms for the Development of Pattern

Plant Pathogens

Temperature Stresses on Plants: How Winter Rye Plants Can Survive By Secreting Their Own Anti-freeze Proteins How the Symplocarpus foetidus Model Plant is Capable of Thermoregulation

Epigenetic Control Of Gene Expression In Plants

Genetically Modified "Golden Rice" That Could Avert Health Afflictions Now Ravaging People in the Developing World - Presented by Dr. Ingo Potrykus
-end-
For further information and for press registration for the meeting, contact Brian Hyps at bhyps@aspb.org or at 301-251-0560, ext. 114.

Founded in 1924, ASPB changed its name this year from the American Society of Plant Physiologists to reflect the broader diversity of plant scientists in its membership. ASPB is a non-profit society representing more than 5,000 plant scientists. ASPB publishes two of the most widely cited plant science journals, The Plant Cell and Plant Physiology.

American Society of Plant Biologists

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