Nav: Home

Breath tests may allow for earlier detection of pancreatic cancer

July 18, 2018

Pancreatic cancer carries a very poor prognosis as most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage. Now a new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study indicates that breath analyses may help detect pancreatic cancer earlier, when curative treatments may be possible.

For the study, investigators examined volatile organic compounds in breath samples from patients with localized and metastatic pancreatic cancers, compared with patients with benign pancreatic disease and some with a normal pancreas. Tests identified 12 compounds that were indicative of pancreatic cancer. These compounds were from three main chemical groups, namely aldehydes, alkanes and alcohols.

"The final application of breath testing in the patient care pathway will depend on test sensitivity and specificity in large multicentre clinical trials, and its performance in early pancreatic cancer and high-risk groups," the authors wrote.
-end-


Wiley

Related Pancreatic Cancer Articles:

Bringing the 'sticky' back to pancreatic cancer
A multidisciplinary team of researchers at Japan's Tohoku University has found that a gene regulator, called BACH1, facilitates the spread of pancreatic cancer to other parts of the body.
Does lung damage speed pancreatic cancer?
High levels of CO2 in the body, due to chronic respiratory disorders, may exacerbate pancreatic cancer, making it more aggressive and resistant to therapy.
Scientists have identified the presence of cancer-suppressing cells in pancreatic cancer
Researchers have identified cells containing a protein called Meflin that has a role in restraining the progression of pancreatic cancer.
Pancreatic cancer discovery reveals how the aggressive cancer fuels its growth
A new discovery about pancreatic cancer sheds light on how the cancer fuels its growth and may help explain how promising cancer drugs work -- and for whom they will fail.
Overcoming resistance in pancreatic cancer
In pancreatic cancer cells' struggle to survive, the cells choose alternative routes when their main pathways are blocked by drugs.
Exposing how pancreatic cancer does its dirty work
Pancreatic cancer is a puzzle -- tumors slough off cells into the bloodstream early in the disease, but the tumors themselves have almost no blood vessels in them.
Targeting cell division in pancreatic cancer
Study provides new evidence of synergistic effects of drugs that inhibit cell division and support for further clinical trials.
Key to targeting the spread of pancreatic cancer
Targeting the tissue around pancreatic cancer cells may be the key to stopping their spread and improving chemotherapy outcomes.
Reprogramming pancreatic cancer
A type of white blood cell that has been especially susceptible to being deceived by pancreatic cancer cells into not attacking them can be 're-programmed' via a specially designed molecule that activates a protein found on their surfaces.
Pancreatic cancer collective comments on promising new pancreatic cancer
Lustgarten Foundation and SU2C offer comments on research describing a new combination drug therapy demonstrating promise for patients with pancreatic cancer.
More Pancreatic Cancer News and Pancreatic Cancer Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.