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Mediterranean diet may improve academic performance by affecting sleep

July 18, 2018

A new Acta Paediatrica study indicates that following the Mediterranean diet may improve adolescents' academic performance, and the effect may relate to sleep quality.

In the study of 269 adolescents from 38 secondary schools and sport clubs in Castellon, Spain, adherence to the Mediterranean diet was positively associated with academic grades and verbal ability.

Results from the study suggested that adherence to the Mediterranean diet could indirectly influence some academic performance variables through its effects on sleep quality, according to senior author Dr. Diego Moliner-Urdiales, of University Jaume I, in Spain.
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Wiley

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