Nav: Home

Old Theban port of Chalcis: A medieval maritime crossroads in Greece

July 18, 2018

In the 12th century, the Byzantine Empire was flourishing and the city of Thebes--between Corinth and Athens--was a bustling center of commercial and cultural exchange. Its outlet to the sea was the port of Chalcis, part of a vast maritime trade network. In addition to agricultural products and silk, ceramic tableware was shipped from Chalcis throughout the Mediterranean. Most of this tableware has been assigned to the main Middle Byzantine Production (MBP) ceramic type.

The research team examined one lot of MBP ceramics salvaged from a wreck discovered by the island of Kavalliani, near Chalcis, in the Southern Euboean Gulf. Analyses performed at the Archéologie et Archéométrie research unit revealed their chemical composition, which the scientists then compared with that of ceramics known to have been produced at Chalcis. The chemical profiles were a match, leading them to conclude that MBP ceramics were indeed manufactured in Chalcis. This was followed up with a study of pieces from the collections of the Cité de la Céramique in Sèvres, in collaboration with the Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France (French Ministry of Culture).

These findings provide a new perspective on medieval Mediterranean trade and reveal that Chalcis was an epicenter of maritime commerce, exporting goods across a vast territory. They also pinpoint the place of manufacture of a large number of Byzantine ceramics currently on display in museums around the world.
-end-


CNRS

Related Ceramics Articles:

Current model for storing nuclear waste is incomplete
The materials the United States and other countries plan to use to store high level nuclear waste will likely degrade faster than anyone previously knew, because of the way those materials interact, new research shows.
FEFU scientists participate in development of ceramic materials that are IR-transparent
Scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) teamed up with colleagues from Institute of Chemistry (FEB RAS), Institute for Single Crystals (Ukraine), and Shanghai Institute of Ceramics (Chinese Academy of Sciences) to develop Y2O3?MgO nanocomposite ceramics with uniform distribution of two phases, microhardness over 11 GPa, and average grain size of 250 nm.
Ceramic industry should use carbon reducing cold sintering process says new research
A new techno-economic analysis, by a team led by a researcher from WMG at the University of Warwick, shows that the energy intensive ceramic industry would gain both financial and environmental benefits if it moved to free the cold sintering process from languishing in labs to actual use in manufacturing everything from high tech to domestic ceramics.
New technique to improve ductility of ceramic materials for missiles, engines
Purdue University researchers have developed a new process to help overcome the brittle nature of ceramics and make it more ductile and durable.
Lasers enable engineers to weld ceramics, no furnace required
Smartphones that don't scratch or shatter. Metal-free pacemakers. Electronics for space and other harsh environments.
FEFU scientists to broaden ideas about reactive sintering of transparent ceramics
Green bodies' porous structure, i.e. mesostructure, affects dramatically the functional parameters of the optical ceramics obtained by reactive sintering.
Simple and low-cost crack-healing of ceramic-based composites
A team of researchers at Osaka University demonstrated that cracks induced in composites consisting of alumina ceramics and titanium could be healed at room temperature, a world-first.
'X-ray gun' helps researchers pinpoint the origins of pottery found on ancient shipwreck
About eight hundred years ago, a ship sank in the Java Sea.
Multifunctional dream ceramic matrix composites are born!
Researchers at Osaka University produced composites consisting of alumina (Al2O3) ceramics and titanium (Ti), namely Al2O3/Ti composites.
Improved thermal-shock resistance in industrial ceramics
Ceramic materials are used in nuclear, chemical and electrical power generation industries because of their ability to withstand extreme environments.
More Ceramics News and Ceramics Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.