Nav: Home

New research shows men more aggressive on dating sites, women more self-conscious

July 19, 2016

BINGHAMTON, NY - When it comes to messaging users on dating websites, men tend to be more aggressive and contact users they are interested in, whereas women tend to be more conscious of their own attractiveness to other users, according to new research.

Using data collected from Baihe, one of the largest dating websites in China, researchers from Binghamton University, University of Massachusetts Lowell and Northeastern University developed a reciprocal recommendation system that better matches users who are mutually interested in and likely to communicate with each other. The data revealed behavioral differences between male and female users when it comes to contacting potential partners. In particular, males tend to be focused on their own interests and be oblivious toward their attractiveness to potential dates, while females are more conscious of their own attractiveness.

Binghamton University PhD candidate Shuangfei Zhai is co-author of the paper, along with Benyuan Liu, Yizhou Sun, Cindy Chen and lead researcher Peng Xia. "We found that males like to send a lot of messages to attractive female users, but they don't get a lot of responses," said Zhai.

When looking for potential matches, the research shows that women take their own attractiveness into consideration, whereas men are more oblivious to this.

"For females, they're self-conscious because they tend to evaluate the likelihood of getting a response to the user that they're sending messages to. In terms of the data, it shows that women have a much larger chance of getting responses from users that they send messages to," said Zhai.

The study, "Design of Reciprocal Recommendation Systems for Online Dating," was published in Social Network Analysis and Mining.
-end-


Binghamton University

Related Attractiveness Articles:

Perceptions about body image linked to increased alcohol, tobacco use for teens
Virginia Ramseyer-Winter, assistant professor of social work, found negative body image is associated with increased tobacco and alcohol use, with implications for both young men and women.
There's more to attraction than what meets the eye
Attractiveness isn't just a matter of good looks, but also the right voice and scent, highlights a mini review in Frontiers in Psychology.
Are looks more important than personality when choosing a man?
When mothers and daughters have to choose potential partners, they do not look much further than skin deep.
Do you really get paid less if you're 'ugly'?
Do beautiful people earn more while those who are not so gorgeous are paid less?
Study finds that people are attracted to outward signs of health, not actual health
Findings published in the journal Behavioral Ecology reveal that skin with yellow and red pigments is perceived as more attractive in Caucasian males, but this skin coloring does not necessarily signal actual good health.
Voice appeal
In a study to be presented during the 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and the 5th Joint Meeting with Acoustical Society of Japan, a Canadian researcher has new data about the vocal attractiveness of consonants.
New research shows men more aggressive on dating sites, women more self-conscious
When it comes to messaging users on dating websites, men tend to be more aggressive and contact users they are interested in, whereas women tend to be more conscious of their own attractiveness to other users, according to new research.
Opposites attract -- unless you're in a relationship
If we are in a relationship we are more likely to be attracted to faces resembling our own, but for single people, opposites attract.
Children less likely to trust ugly people
Is beauty only skin deep? Children don't seem to think so, like adults and babies, children think the uglier you are, the less trustworthy you are.
The art and science of promotional pricing
Normal rules of economic behavior would dictate that free upgrades to a particular product would move it out the door in record numbers.

Related Attractiveness Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Changing The World
What does it take to change the world for the better? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on activism—what motivates it, why it matters, and how each of us can make a difference. Guests include civil rights activist Ruby Sales, labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, author Jeremy Heimans, "craftivist" Sarah Corbett, and designer and futurist Angela Oguntala.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#520 A Closer Look at Objectivism
This week we broach the topic of Objectivism. We'll be speaking with Keith Lockitch, senior fellow at the Ayn Rand Institute, about the philosophy of Objectivism as it's taught through Ayn Rand's writings. Then we'll speak with Denise Cummins, cognitive scientist, author and fellow at the Association for Psychological Science, about the impact of Objectivist ideology on society. Related links: This is what happens when you take Ayn Rand seriously Another Critic Who Doesn’t Care What Rand Thought or Why She Thought It, Only That She’s Wrong Quote is from "A Companion to Ayn Rand"