NUST MISIS scientists present metamaterial for solar cells and nanooptics

July 23, 2018

A research team from the NUST MISIS Laboratory of Superconducting Metamaterials led by Alexey Basharin, Senior Lecturer and Candidate of Technical Sciences, has developed a metamaterial-dielectric that has unique characteristics and is easy to manufacture. This ease of access will allow researchers to use it to create the latest optical devices. The research results were published in Laser&Photonics Reviews.

Anapole is a non-emitting diffuser transparent to electromagnetic radiation. In 2017, a research team from the Laboratory of Superconducting Metamaterials and their colleagues from the University of Crete (Heraklion) established that anapole is an ideal resonator. When irradiated from the outside, anapole retains all the energy inside itself, while the electromagnetic oscillations fade very slowly.

Compared to metallic metamaterials, dielectric metamaterials are more promising as they do not heat under exposure to electromagnetic radiation, which minimizes their energy dispersion. Every dielectric metamaterial can even be used in the optical spectrum to control its resonance.

The research team's work demonstrates a promising new direction in the development of metamaterials. Previously, dielectric metamaterials were manufactured by the fabrication of complex dielectric (spherical or cylindrical) nanoparticles or by the deposition of various nanolayers. However, the research team from the Laboratory of Superconducting Metamaterials has shown that metamaterials can be manufactured by perforating holes in the thin film of silicon or other dielectrics. One of the easiest ways to do this is to use a FIB beam - a focused ion beam that create holes up to 5 nm large.

«In the theoretical part of the experiment, we were able to show that in the optical frequency range it will be possible to excite a special anapole condition which is promising for the strong localization of electromagnetic fields, as well as sensors. In addition, we have found that these metamaterials can be transparent to electromagnetic waves, which in real experiments with silicon should show the evidence of our technique and significantly increase the transparency of silicon plates, for example, for use in solar batteries», said Alexey Basharin, head of the project.

The scientists suggest that this new metamaterial can be used in silicon nanooptics and solar cells. Work on the experimental part of the study is currently continuing with RAS and international partners.
-end-
«The scientific work of the research team from the NUST MISIS Laboratory of Superconducting Metamaterials led by Senior Lecturer Alexey Basharin, Candidate of Technical Sciences [has been] published in a scientific journal with an impact factor of 8.5. This is a bright example and proof of NUST MISIS`s students and stature [in the scientific community]. PhD student Anar Ospanov and Master`s degree student Ivan Stenischev, who participated in the study with an academic supervisor, are now listed among the authors of the paper», - said Alevtina Chernikova, Rector of NUST MISIS.

National University of Science and Technology MISIS

Related Solar Cells Articles from Brightsurf:

Solar cells of the future
Organic solar cells are cheaper to produce and more flexible than their counterparts made of crystalline silicon, but do not offer the same level of efficiency or stability.

A blast of gas for better solar cells
Treating silicon with carbon dioxide gas in plasma processing brings simplicity and control to a key step for making solar cells.

Record efficiency for printed solar cells
A new study reports the highest efficiency ever recorded for full roll-to-roll printed perovskite solar cells.

Next gen solar cells perform better when there's a camera around
A literal ''trick of the light'' can detect imperfections in next-gen solar cells, boosting their efficiency to match that of existing silicon-based versions, researchers have found.

On the trail of organic solar cells' efficiency
Scientists at TU Dresden and Hasselt University in Belgium investigated the physical causes that limit the efficiency of novel solar cells based on organic molecular materials.

Exciting tweaks for organic solar cells
A molecular tweak has improved organic solar cell performance, bringing us closer to cheaper, efficient, and more easily manufactured photovoltaics.

For cheaper solar cells, thinner really is better
Researchers at MIT and at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have outlined a pathway to slashing costs further, this time by slimming down the silicon cells themselves.

Flexible thinking on silicon solar cells
Combining silicon with a highly elastic polymer backing produces solar cells that have record-breaking stretchability and high efficiency.

Perovskite solar cells get an upgrade
Rice University materials scientists find inorganic compounds quench defects in perovskite-based solar cells and expand their tolerance of light, humidity and heat.

Can solar technology kill cancer cells?
Michigan State University scientists have revealed a new way to detect and attack cancer cells using technology traditionally reserved for solar power.

Read More: Solar Cells News and Solar Cells Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.