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New study uncovers how lutemax 2020 protects the eyes against blue light damage

July 23, 2018

Morristown, N.J., June 29, 2018 - In a new study published in Nutrients titled "Lutein and Zeaxanthin Isomers Protect Against Light-induced Retinopathy via Decreasing Oxidative and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in BALB/cJ Mice", Lutemax 2020 supplementation was shown to protect photoreceptors against blue light damage by mitigating oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress--a primary mechanism associated with photoreceptor damage and visual impairment.

Lutein and the zeaxanthin isomers (RR-zeaxanthin and RS [meso]-zeaxanthin) are found in high concentration in the macula--a region of the eye that provides the highest visual acuity and is also exposed to high levels of blue light. As potent antioxidants and filters of blue light, they play a critical role in preserving visual function, especially as exposure to blue light from a variety of sources has steadily increased. The protective qualities of the macular carotenoids are well established, however, the mechanisms by which they protect have not been well explored. This study effectively shows for the first time that blue light causes damage to the retinal tissue by not only promoting oxidative stress, which has been reported earlier, but also increases stress in the endoplasmic reticulum.

Lutein and zeaxanthin isomers from Lutemax 2020 were shown to downregulate the genes involved in causing endoplasmic reticulum stress, and thereby protect the sensitive photoreceptors when exposed to blue light.

Lutemax 2020 is a naturally-derived ingredient from marigold flowers best known for providing all three macular carotenoids--lutein and both zeaxanthin isomers (RR-zeaxanthin and RS [meso]-zeaxanthin. Beyond this new research, Lutemax 2020 has demonstrated other vision health and performance benefits in multiple studies including LAMA (Lutein, Vision and Mental Acuity) I and II and B.L.U.E. (Blue Light User Exposure).

"This study addresses the growing public health issue of blue light exposure across all age groups and along with our prior research further demonstrates the importance of consistent and adequate intake of these important nutrients for healthy vision," said Jayant Deshpande, CTO, OmniActive Health Technologies. "Public awareness of blue light and its effects on eye health are new but steadily growing and we are leading the research to understand how macular carotenoids protect the eyes in an effort to help preserve visual performance and fight age-related eye diseases."
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For more information please contact Sara Zoet at s.zoet@omniactives.com.

About OmniActive Health Technologies

OmniActive Health Technologies (omniactives.com) offers a wide range of premium, scientifically-validated ingredients to address complex challenges for customers in the dietary supplement and functional food and beverage space. OmniActive brings added value, with a focus on healthy living as well as healthy aging through IP-protected, science-backed branded ingredients from natural sources.

OmniActive Health Technologies

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