Boy recovering after receiving small bowel transplant

July 24, 2003

INDIANAPOLIS -- A 3-year-old boy is recovering after receiving a small bowel transplant by surgeons at Riley Hospital for Children. He is the first person to undergo the life-saving five-and-a-half hour procedure in Indiana.

"The surgery was successful and the patient is making a great recovery," says lead surgeon Joseph Tector, M.D., assistant professor at the Indiana University School of Medicine, commenting on the July 22 procedure. "This was a total team effort from beginning to end requiring our best specialists."

The boy's name and hometown are being withheld at this time at the request of his parents.

A small bowel transplant is an option for people who are suffering from intestinal failure and who are unable to absorb required nutrition through regular digestive processes.

To date, intestinal transplants have been performed only at a select number of institutions because few surgeons are qualified and trained to perform them. Intestinal transplants also are among the most difficult to perform and require a strong commitment from a highly skilled multi-disciplinary team, including the very best in intensive care and in administrative support.

In 1965, Indiana's first kidney transplant was performed at the Indiana University School of Medicine. Hundreds of organ transplant procedures have been performed at IU and Riley hospitals since that time.

Thirty-eight years later, Clarian Health Partners, which includes IU, Riley and Methodist hospitals, continues to exceed the standard with the state's first intestinal transplant.

Overall, the Clarian Transplant Center is a national leader in transplant services, ranking seventh in the country in volume.
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Indiana University

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