Nav: Home

Consuming 60 grams of nuts a day improves sexual function

July 24, 2019

Researchers from the Human Nutrition Unit of the Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Tarragona/Spain) and the Pere Virgili Health Research Institute (IISPV) have found that consuming 60 grams of nuts a day improves sexual function. They have conducted the first nutritional intervention study with healthy participants of reproductive age in order to determine if regular consumption of nuts has any effect on sexual function. The analysis forms part of the FERTINUTS project, which has been created to assess the effects of regularly consuming nuts on the quality of semen.

Sample and results

The prevalence of erectile and sexual dysfunction is thought to affect 2% of men under the age of 40 years, around 52% of men aged 40 to 70 years and more than 85% of men over 80. The risk factors associated with sexual and erectile dysfunction are smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, a lack of physical exercise, stress and an unhealthy diet.

In a previous study, the same research group described how certain nuts (walnuts, hazelnuts and almonds) improved sperm quality, although there were still no studies demonstrating the positive effects of these nuts on sexual function.

Their most recent study was conducted on 83 individuals who were following a western diet (poor in fruit and vegetables and rich in animal fats). The participants were divided into two groups: one group continued to follow their normal western diet over 14 weeks while the other complimented their diet with a daily intake of 60 grams of walnuts, hazelnuts and almonds. At the end of the study period, each individual completed an internationally validated questionnaire known as the IIEF-15 containing 15 questions on sexual function.

The findings show that adding walnuts, hazelnuts and almonds to an unhealthy western diet can improve sexual desire and orgasm quality. The researchers also pointed out that further studies involving more participants are needed to confirm these results and to determine how these benefits arise.

The study was published in the scientific journal Nutrients and was written by the post-doctoral researcher Albert Salas-Huetos (currently working at the University of Utah) in collaboration with the URV's Human Nutrition Unit and CIBERobn Network ), led by URV professor Jordi Salas-Salvadó.
-end-
Reference: Salas-Huetos A, Muralidharan J, Galiè S, Salas-Salvadó J & Bulló M (2019). "Effect of Nut Consumption on Erectile and Sexual Function in Healthy Males: A Secondary Outcome Analysis of the FERTINUTS Randomized Controlled Trial". Nutrients, 11(6)1372. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061372.

Universitat Rovira i Virgili

Related Diet Articles:

Poor diet can lead to blindness
An extreme case of 'fussy' or 'picky' eating caused a young patient's blindness, according to a new case report published today [2 Sep 2019] in Annals of Internal Medicine.
New research on diet and supplements during pregnancy and beyond
The foods and nutrients a woman consumes while pregnant have important health implications for her and her baby.
Special issue: Diet and Health
Diet has major effects on human health. In this special issue of Science, 'Diet and Health,' four Reviews explore the connections between what we eat and our well-being, as well as the continuing controversies in this space.
Should you eat a low-gluten diet?
When healthy people eat a low-gluten and fiber-rich diet compared with a high-gluten diet they experience less intestinal discomfort including less bloating which researchers at University of Copenhagen show are due to changes of the composition and function of gut bacteria.
If your diet fails, try again; your heart will thank you
Risk factors for cardiovascular disease closely track with changes in eating patterns, even only after a month or so.
The brain diet
Scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) find that high levels of a hormone called FGF23 are linked to changes in brain structure.
You are never too old for the Mediterranean diet
The Mediterranean diet as a secret of long life for elderly.
Getting to the roots of our ancient cousin's diet
Since the discovery of the fossil remains of Australopithecus africanus from Taung nearly a century ago, and subsequent discoveries of Paranthropus robustus, there have been disagreements about the diets of these two South African hominin species.
A diverse diet may not be the healthiest one
Scientific evidence to date does not support the notion that eating a diverse diet is healthy or promotes a healthy weight.
How was Mediterranean diet associated with severity of psoriasis?
Adherence to a Mediterranean diet, an eating plan filled with fruits and vegetables, legumes, cereals, bread, fish, fruit, nuts and extra-virgin olive oil, may be associated with the severity of the skin condition psoriasis.
More Diet News and Diet Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

In & Out Of Love
We think of love as a mysterious, unknowable force. Something that happens to us. But what if we could control it? This hour, TED speakers on whether we can decide to fall in — and out of — love. Guests include writer Mandy Len Catron, biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, musician Dessa, One Love CEO Katie Hood, and psychologist Guy Winch.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#543 Give a Nerd a Gift
Yup, you guessed it... it's Science for the People's annual holiday episode that helps you figure out what sciency books and gifts to get that special nerd on your list. Or maybe you're looking to build up your reading list for the holiday break and a geeky Christmas sweater to wear to an upcoming party. Returning are pop-science power-readers John Dupuis and Joanne Manaster to dish on the best science books they read this past year. And Rachelle Saunders and Bethany Brookshire squee in delight over some truly delightful science-themed non-book objects for those whose bookshelves are already full. Since...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab