Hospital-acquired C. diff associated with substantial costs

July 24, 2019

July 24, 2019 (Arlington, VA) -- Below is a summary of a study published online today in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. This article will be freely available for a limited time. SHEA members have full access to all ICHE articles through the online portal.

Title: Attributable Costs and Length of Stay of Hospital-Acquired Clostridioides difficile: A population-based matched cohort study in Alberta, Canada

Conclusions: In this population-based, propensity score matched analysis using micro-costing data, researchers determined HA-CDI is associated with substantial attributable cost.

Background: Clostridioides difficile CDI places a significant economic burden on the healthcare system. In this study, we used a population-54 based dataset of over two million patients and a rigorous propensity score-based design and micro-costing data to determine the attributable cost and length of stay of HA-CDI among adult inpatients in Alberta, Canada.
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About ICHE

Published through a partnership between the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and Cambridge University Press, Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology provides original, peer reviewed scientific articles for anyone involved with an infection control or epidemiology program in a hospital or healthcare facility. ICHE is ranked 41st out of 89 Infectious Disease Journals in the latest Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports from Thomson Reuters.

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) is a professional society representing more than 2,000 physicians and other healthcare professionals around the world who possess expertise and passion for healthcare epidemiology, infection prevention, and antimicrobial stewardship. The society's work improves public health by establishing infection-prevention measures and supporting antibiotic stewardship among healthcare providers, hospitals, and health systems. This is accomplished by leading research studies, translating research into clinical practice, developing evidence-based policies, optimizing antibiotic stewardship, and advancing the field of healthcare epidemiology. SHEA and its members strive to improve patient outcomes and create a safer, healthier future for all. Visit SHEA online at http://www.shea-online.org, http://www.facebook.com/SHEApreventingHAIs and @SHEA_Epi.

About Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press is part of the University of Cambridge. It furthers the University's mission by disseminating knowledge in the pursuit of education, learning and research at the highest international levels of excellence. Its extensive peer-reviewed publishing lists comprise 45,000 titles covering academic research, professional development, over 400 research journals, school-level education, English language teaching and bible publishing. Playing a leading role in today's international marketplace, Cambridge University Press has over 50 offices around the globe and distributes its products to nearly every country in the world. For further information about Cambridge University Press, visit Cambridge.org.

Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

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