Magnetic eyelashes: A new source of MRI artifacts

July 24, 2019

Leesburg, VA, July 24, 2019--A new cosmetic product, magnetic eyelashes, should be of interest and concern to radiology professionals working in the MRI environment, according to an ahead-of-print article published in the November 2019 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR).

With U.S. sales of false eyelashes having increased 31% since 2017 and magnetic eyelashes trending as the top beauty-related Google search of 2018, Einat Slonimsky and Alexander Mamourian at Penn State Health used a phantom to show that magnetic eyelashes worn during MRI can cause substantial artifact and that detachment of the eyelashes from the phantom can occur.

"Our purpose was to evaluate the magnitude of the susceptibility artifacts created by magnetic eyelashes on multiple standard imaging sequences and compare these artifacts with those created by aneurysm clips, which are a common source of image distortion," wrote Slonimsky and Mamourian. Using two sets of magnetic eyelashes from the same manufacturer that were randomly selected and purchased online, the phantom was created by drilling multiple 2-mm holes in a plastic container and then running monofilament line through these holes to create a grid. The two sets of eyelashes were attached to single nylon strings, placed diagonally within the phantom. The phantom was then submerged in a container filled with distilled water, covered with a layer of plastic film to prevent free movement of the lashes, should they detach.

MRI was performed using a 3-T scanner with T2-weighted images, FLAIR images, T1-weighted images, susceptibility-weighted images, DW images, T1-weighted magnetization-prepared rapid-acquisition gradient-echo images, and T2-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolutions.

Ultimately, the magnetic eyelashes evidenced an artifact much larger than that created by the aneurysm clips (two made of cobalt alloy, one made of titanium) using the same sequences--measuring 7 × 6 cm maximal on susceptibility-weighted images, obscuring the entire phantom. Although the eyelashes stayed attached to the strings during the scan, upon removal of the phantom from the bore, one set of eyelashes detached from its string. Restrained by the plastic covering, it became attracted to the other eyelashes still attached to the phantom.

"Although friction and adhesion may differ from patient to patient, depending on the width and character of the native eyelashes of an individual," Slonimsky and Mamourian wrote, "we strongly recommend inserting a line about magnetic eyelashes on the MRI safety questionnaire and adding stops in the screening system to prevent the entry of anyone with these lashes, including staff, into the MRI scanner room."
-end-


American Roentgen Ray Society

Related MRI Articles from Brightsurf:

Does MRI have an environmental impact?
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have surveyed the amount of gadolinium found in river water in Tokyo.

MRI predict intelligence levels in children?
A group of researchers from the Skoltech Center for Computational and Data-Intensive Science and Engineering (CDISE) took 4th place in the international MRI-based adolescent intelligence prediction competition.

7T MRI offers new insights into multiple sclerosis
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have completed a new study using 7 Tesla (7T) MRI -- a far more powerful imaging technology -- to further examine LME in MS patients

Magnetic eyelashes: A new source of MRI artifacts
American Journal of Roentgenology researchers used a phantom to show that magnetic eyelashes worn during MRI can cause substantial artifact and that detachment of the eyelashes from the phantom can occur.

High-strength MRI tracks MS progression
The development of scars, or lesions, in the brain's cortical gray matter is a powerful predictor of neurological disability for people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to new study.

Non-contrast MRI is effective in monitoring MS patients
Brain MRI without contrast agent is just as effective as the contrast-enhanced approach for monitoring disease progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study.

Researchers use MRI to predict Alzheimer's disease
MRI brain scans perform better than common clinical tests at predicting which people will go on to develop Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study.

Monitoring electromagnetic signals in the brain with MRI
MIT engineers have devised a new technique to detect either electrical activity or optical signals in the brain, using a minimally invasive technique based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

MRI 'glove' provides new look at hand anatomy
A new kind of MRI component in the shape of a glove delivers the first clear images of bones, tendons and ligaments moving together.

Why we need erasable MRI scans
Gas-filled protein structures could one day be used as 'erasable' contrast agents for MRI scans.

Read More: MRI News and MRI Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.