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What happens when you overdose? (video)

July 25, 2019

WASHINGTON, July 25, 2019 -- Your body is a delicately balanced chemical system, and if you take too much of a drug, you destroy that balance. That's what happens when you overdose. This week on Reactions, learn how to spot an overdose and the ways different types of drugs wreak havoc on your brain: https://youtu.be/xLSz3wEgwJ8.
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Reactions is a video series produced by the American Chemical Society and PBS Digital Studios. Subscribe to Reactions at http://bit.ly/ACSReactions, and follow us on Twitter @ACSreactions. For more of the latest research news, journalists and public information officers are encouraged to apply for complimentary press registration for the ACS fall 2019 national meeting in San Diego.

The American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, is a not-for-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. ACS is a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related information and research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

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