Nav: Home

Generic mobile phone chargers escalate risk of burn, electrocution

July 25, 2019

Electric currents generated by mobile phone chargers, particularly from lower-cost generic manufacturers, are causing serious injuries. Generic mobile phone chargers are less likely to meet established safety and quality tests than the brand counterparts, according to analysis and case studies in Annals of Emergency Medicine.

"Generic phone chargers can cause burns or electrocutions," said Carissa Bunke, MD, a pediatric resident physician with University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital and lead study author. "Teens and adolescents are particularly at risk of injury due to their frequent mobile device use. They should be advised to not sleep with their phones or mobile devices charging in bed and avoid leaving the charger plugged in when it is not connected to a phone."

In one case cited, a patient was thrown from his bed by electric current. Another involved a 19-year old woman injured when the end of a charger touched her necklace, transmitting electric current and causing second degree burns. (image)

The analysis notes that for a study conducted by Electrical Safety First in the United Kingdom, Apple provided 64 generic chargers for safety testing. Fifty-eight percent of these generic chargers failed the electric strength test, indicating a breakdown of the insulation barrier. Another test cited in the analysis evaluated 400 generic iPhone chargers for electric shock safety risks. Of these, twenty-two samples were immediately damaged during the testing process and only three samples passed an electric strength test, a 99 percent failure rate.

"Even with a low-voltage device, if the current is high, then the electric shock can be severe," Dr. Bunke said.

Generally, patients with these types of injuries require medication to manage their pain and follow-up at their primary care provider or the burn center. In most instances, patients are checked for irregular heart rhythm or related side effects. Severe cases could involve extensive tissue damage or deep burns that require skin grafts. Complications from these types of injuries could include muscle breakdown, trouble breathing or airway damage, or cardiovascular injuries.
-end-
Read more: https://www.annemergmed.com/article/S0196-0644(19)30438-X/fulltext

Annals of Emergency Medicine is the peer-reviewed scientific journal for the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), the national medical society representing emergency medicine. Through continuing education, research, public education and advocacy, ACEP advances emergency care on behalf of its 38,000 emergency physician members, and the more than 150 million Americans they treat on an annual basis. For more information, visit http://www.acep.org.

For further information: Steve Arnoff | sarnoff@acep.org | Twitter: @emergencydocs

American College of Emergency Physicians

Related Injuries Articles:

Generating improvement in spinal cord injuries
Results from an ongoing treatment for spinal cord injury research study were announced on Jan.
Genitourinary injuries challenge returning US servicemen
In an article in The Journal of Urology, researchers from the US military medical community have examined the extent and severity of genitourinary injuries among nearly 1,400 US service members (SMs) and emphasize the critical need for novel treatments to improve sexual, urinary, or reproductive function among those with severe genital injury.
Many alcohol-related injuries occur at home
Of all alcohol-related injuries in various public hospital emergency departments in Queensland, Australia, more occurred at home than at licensed premises.
Don't freestyle 'swimmer's shoulder' injuries
Elite and competitive swimmers log between 60,000 and 80,000 meters weekly -- swimming the length of an Olympic-sized pool 1,200 times -- which places significant stress on their shoulder joints.
Hamstring injuries in baseball may be preventable
Creating a program to prevent hamstring injuries in minor league and major league baseball players might be a possibility say researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting in Colorado Springs, Colo.
New technology could deliver drugs to brain injuries
A new study led by scientists at the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute describes a technology that could lead to new therapeutics for traumatic brain injuries.
Could flies help us understand brain injuries?
A new study led by SDSU scientists suggests that using fruit flies as a traumatic brain injury model may hold the key to identifying important genes and pathways that promote the repair of and minimize damage to the nervous system.
Why are women more prone to knee injuries than men?
Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that women who take the birth control pill, which lessen and stabilize estrogen levels, were less likely to suffer serious knee injuries.
Global toll of injuries down by almost a third since 1990
The global toll taken by injuries on daily life has fallen by almost a third in the past quarter of a century, reveals research published online in the journal Injury Prevention.
Surge in bicycle injuries to riders over 45
The incidence of bicycle accidents has increased significantly in the US in recent years, with many serious injuries occurring among riders older than 45, according to a new study led by UCSF.

Related Injuries Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...