Nav: Home

Trapping female mosquitoes helps curb chikungunya virus

July 25, 2019

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently developed an Autocidal Gravid Ovitrap (AGP trap) that attracts and captures female mosquitos looking for a site to lay eggs. Now, researchers writing in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases report that AGO traps successfully protected people from infection with chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in communities in Puerto Rico.

The lack of effective tools to control Aedes aegypti mosquito populations has resulted in the continued expansion of dengue virus, Zika virus and CHIKV. Some recent attempts at curbing mosquito populations have resulted in reductions in mosquito density but not reductions in human disease. AGO traps consist of a pail with hay and water to attract egg-bearing female mosquitos and a sticky lining to which the insects adhere. Previous studies have shown that placing three AGO traps outside of 85% of homes in a community resulted in an 80% reduction in adult mosquito populations but the studies did not assess rates of mosquito-borne diseases in humans.

In the new work, Tyler Sharp, of the CDC, and colleagues randomly selected 290 households in Puerto Rican communities that had AGO trap interventions and 349 households in communities without AGO traps. 175 household members from intervention communities and 152 from non-intervention communities were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were collected from each participant to detect CHIKV infection and surveys recorded demographic information as well as data on mosquito repellant and bed net use and frequency of mosquito bites.

A total of 114 participants (34.9%) were seropositive for CHIKV. Among people who spent most of their daytime hours inside the community they lived in, 10.3% were seropositive for CHIKV in communities with AGO traps whereas 48.7% were positive for CHIKV in communities without traps. Among all participants, including those who did not spend as much daylight time within the community, 26.1% were seropositive for CHIKV in the intervention communities and 43.8% were positive in communities without traps.

"AGO traps are a novel chemical-free, effective approach to control Ae. aegypti populations and provide protection from infection with the pathogens that these mosquitos transmit," the researchers say. "Further evaluations should determine if AGO traps are sustainable and effective in larger scale community trials."
-end-
Citation: Sharp TM, Lorenzi O, Torres-Velásquez B, Acevedo V, Pérez-Padilla J, et al. (2019) Autocidal gravid ovitraps protect humans from chikungunya virus infection by reducing Aedes aegypti mosquito populations. PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases 13(7): e0007538. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007538

Funding: The authors received no specific funding for this work.

Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. Autocidal gravid ovitraps (AGO traps) used in this study were developed and constructed by CDC personnel (RB). Rights for the AGO trap patent (US 9.237,741 B2) were transferred to the US Government (Executive Order 10096). Eventual royalties derived from trap sales by licensed companies follow 15 U.S.C. 3710c.

In your coverage please use this URL to provide access to the freely available paper: http://journals.plos.org/plosntds/article?id=10.1371/journal.pntd. 0007538

PLOS

Related Infection Articles:

Male infertility: Urogenital infection as a possible cause
In couples who have not been able to have children, male infertility is the cause in at least half of cases.
A novel approach to seeing dengue infection in the body
Positron emission tomography (PET) paired with the glucose metabolism probe, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), is considered 'old' technology in the field of cancer.
Smelling the risk of infection
Humans and monkeys are social beings and benefit from a community.
Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection
The HIV virus increases the potency of the tuberculosis bacterium (Mtb) by affecting a central function of the immune system.
New insight into course and transmission of Zika infection
In one of the first and largest studies of its kind, a research team lead by virologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has characterized the progression of two strains of the viral infection.
UTMB researchers protect against lethal Ebola Sudan infection four days after infection
Researchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, in collaboration with Arbutus Biopharma Corporation, have protected nonhuman primates against Ebola Sudan four days following exposure to the virus.
How tumor necrosis factor protects against infection
Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a messenger substance in the immune system, plays an important role in triggering chronic inflammatory diseases.
Gene amplification -- the fast track to infection
Researchers at UmeƄ University in Sweden are first to discover that bacteria can multiply disease-inducing genes which are needed to rapidly cause infection.
New test allows for one-step diagnosis of HCV infection
The current standard in diagnosing Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection requires two sequential steps that make it suboptimal, costly, inconvenient, time consuming, and globally not widely available or affordable.
Do dressings prevent infection?
There is insufficient evidence to know whether dressings reduce the risk of wound infection after surgery and, in some cases, leaving a wound exposed may be better, say researchers in The BMJ today.

Related Infection Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...