MR spectroscopy helps identify cancerous breast tumors

July 26, 2005

OAK BROOK, Ill.--Measuring the biochemical changes in breast tumors with magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy enables radiologists to more accurately distinguish benign tumors from cancerous ones, according to a study appearing in the August issue of the journal Radiology.

"Adding spectroscopy to breast MR examinations will not only reduce concern over possible missed cancers and unnecessary biopsy procedures, it may also improve the efficiency and quality of patient care," said co-author Sina Meisamy, M.D., a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Minnesota Center for Magnetic Resonance Research in Minneapolis.

MR imaging of the breasts has a high rate of sensitivity (94 percent - 100 percent) for detecting tumors, but a variable rate of specificity (37 percent - 97 percent) for distinguishing malignant from benign tumors.

MR spectroscopy uses the same magnet and electronics as MR imaging, but with specialized methods that produce a "spectrum" identifying different chemical compounds in the tissues. MR spectroscopy has been shown to be useful for looking at various disorders, including cancer, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes and certain inflammatory and ischemic diseases. Generally used for the brain, spectroscopy poses no known health risk to patients and typically adds only seven to 10 minutes to the MR procedure.

For the study, four radiologists evaluated 55 breast MR imaging cases that had findings confirmed through earlier biopsies. The evaluations were done with and without MR spectroscopy. The addition of spectroscopy resulted in more cancerous tumors detected (from 87 percent to 94 percent), a higher success rate for distinguishing benign from malignant tumors (from 51 percent to 57 percent) and a greater agreement among the radiologists on their findings. Also, with the addition of spectroscopic readings, two of the four radiologists had significantly improved sensitivity to detect cancerous tumors and all four participants achieved significantly improved accuracy in assigning a probability of malignancy.

"Spectroscopy gives us an additional piece of information about the biochemical composition of the tumor," explained senior author Michael Garwood, Ph.D., associate director of the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research and the Lillian Quist - Joyce Henline Chair in Biomedical Research Professor of Radiology at the University of Minnesota. "When the standard MR imaging exam is inconclusive, the spectroscopy measurement can improve the rate of detecting a cancerous breast tumor."
-end-
Radiology is a monthly scientific journal devoted to clinical radiology and allied sciences. The journal is edited by Anthony V. Proto, M.D., School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Va. Radiology is owned and published by the Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA.org/radiologyjnl)

The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) is an association of more than 37,000 radiologists, radiation oncologists, medical physicists and related scientists committed to promoting excellence in radiology through education and by fostering research, with the ultimate goal of improving patient care. The Society is based in Oak Brook, Ill. (RSNA.org)

"Adding in Vivo Quantitative ¹H MR Spectroscopy to Improve Diagnostic Accuracy of Breast MR Imaging: Preliminary Results of Observer Performance Study at 4.0 T." Collaborating with Drs. Meisamy and Garwood on this paper were Patrick J. Bolan, Ph.D., Eva H. Baker, M.D., Ph.D., Matthew G. Pollema, M.D., M.P.H., Chap T. Le, Ph.D., Frederick Kelcz, M.D., Ph.D., Mary C. Lechner, M.D., Barbara A. Luikens, M.D., Richard A. Carlson, M.D., Kathy R. Brandt, M.D., Kimberly K. Amrami, M.D., Michael T. Nelson, M.D., Lenore I. Everson, M.D., Tim H. Emory, M.D., Todd M. Tuttle, M.D., and Douglas Yee, M.D.

Radiological Society of North America

Related Magnetic Resonance Articles from Brightsurf:

Topology gets magnetic: The new wave of topological magnetic materials
The electronic structure of nonmagnetic crystals can be classified by complete theories of band topology, reminiscent of a 'topological periodic table.' However, such a classification for magnetic materials has so far been elusive, and hence very few magnetic topological materials have been discovered to date.

KIST develops ambient vibration energy harvester with automatic resonance tuning mechanism
Korean researchers have developed an energy harvester that can generate electric power from ambient vibrations with diverse frequencies through a novel automatic resonance tuning mechanism.

Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging findings in competitive college athletes after COVID-19
This study investigated the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in competitive college athletes who recovered from COVID-19 to detect myocardial inflammation that would identify high-risk athletes for return to competitive play.

Using magnetic resonance elastography to detect epilepsy
A new study from the Beckman Institute used magnetic resonance elastography to compare the hippocampal stiffness in healthy individuals with those who have epilepsy.

Spintronics: Researchers show how to make non-magnetic materials magnetic
A complex process can modify non-magnetic oxide materials in such a way to make them magnetic.

Manipulating non-magnetic atoms in a chromium halide enables tuning of magnetic properties
The magnetic properties of a chromium halide can be tuned by manipulating the non-magnetic atoms in the material, a team, led by Boston College researchers, reports in the most recent edition of ScienceAdvances.

The magnetic history of ice
The history of our planet has been written, among other things, in the periodic reversal of its magnetic poles.

Single-spin electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum with kilohertz spectral resolution
A high-resolution paramagnetic resonance detection method based on the diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center quantum sensor was proposed and experimentally implemented by academician DU Jiangfeng from USTC.

Convenient location of a near-threshold proton-emitting resonance in 11B
Polish scientists working in Poland, France and USA explained the mysterious β-delayed proton decay of the neutron halo ground state of 11Be.

Detection of very high frequency magnetic resonance could revolutionize electronics
A team of scientists led by a physicist at the University of California, Riverside, has discovered an electrical detection method for terahertz electromagnetic waves, which are extremely difficult to detect.

Read More: Magnetic Resonance News and Magnetic Resonance Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.