Nav: Home

Exploring the microbial dark matter of the human mouth

July 26, 2018

Alexandria, Va., USA - At the 96th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the IADR Pan European Regional (PER) Congress, Alexandra Clark, Queen Mary University of London, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, England gave a poster presentation titled "Exploring the Microbial Dark Matter of the Human Mouth." The IADR/PER General Session & Exhibition is in London, England at the ExCeL London Convention Center from July 25-28, 2018.

Bacterial community profiling targeting 16S rRNA genes has revolutionized knowledge of the diversity of bacteria but recently the use of metagenomic analysis has revealed the presence of bacteria not detected by both culture and traditional 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The majority of these novel organisms fall into one monophyletic group, the Candidate Phyla Radiation (CPR). In this study, Clark and co-authors investigated the presence and the diversity of CPR bacteria in the human mouth and sought to cultivate CPR representatives.

To enrich Saccharibacteria (TM7) Clark and co-authors used a combination of sequential colony hybridisation (CH) enrichment and liquid culture with potential bacterial hosts, and a culture in a mixed in-vitro biofilm model from human saliva samples. The presence of Saccharibacteria and their relative abundance were evaluated by Q-PCR, FISH and 16S sequencing.

The results showed that CH enabled two independent co-isolations of Saccharibacteria HOT352/353 with two hosts but the Saccharibacteria cultures were lost after five and eight passages. Liquid cultures resulted in stable co-culture of Saccharibacteria but higher yields were obtained when the simplified community obtained by CH was propagated as a mixed culture in the biofilm model after preliminary amplification in liquid culture.

A combination of CH and minimal biofilm-eradication concentration is highly promising for the cultivation of Saccharibacteria species. The culture of CPR bacteria will provide insight into their unusual lifestyles and metabolism and role in oral health and disease.
-end-
About the International Association for Dental Research

The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) is a nonprofit organization with over 10,800 individual members worldwide, dedicated to: (1) advancing research and increasing knowledge for the improvement of oral health worldwide, (2) supporting and representing the oral health research community, and (3) facilitating the communication and application of research findings. To learn more, visit http://www.iadr.org.

International & American Associations for Dental Research

Related Bacteria Articles:

How bees live with bacteria
More than 90 percent of all bee species are not organized in colonies, but fight their way through life alone.
The bacteria building your baby
Australian researchers have laid to rest a longstanding controversy: is the womb sterile?
Detecting bacteria in space
A new genomic approach provides a glimpse into the diverse bacterial ecosystem on the International Space Station.
Hopping bacteria
Scientists have long known that key models of bacterial movement in real-world conditions are flawed.
Bacteria uses viral weapon against other bacteria
Bacterial cells use both a virus -- traditionally thought to be an enemy -- and a prehistoric viral protein to kill other bacteria that competes with it for food according to an international team of researchers who believe this has potential implications for future infectious disease treatment.
Drug diversity in bacteria
Bacteria produce a cocktail of various bioactive natural products in order to survive in hostile environments with competing (micro)organisms.
Bacteria walk (a bit) like we do
EPFL biophysicists have been able to directly study the way bacteria move on surfaces, revealing a molecular machinery reminiscent of motor reflexes.
Using bacteria to create a water filter that kills bacteria
Engineers have created a bacteria-filtering membrane using graphene oxide and bacterial nanocellulose.
Probiotics are not always 'good bacteria'
Researchers from the Cockrell School of Engineering were able to shed light on a part of the human body - the digestive system -- where many questions remain unanswered.
A chink in bacteria's armor
Scientists have untangled the structure of a recently discovered bacterial wall-building protein, found in nearly all bacteria.
More Bacteria News and Bacteria Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.