Researchers develop novel imaging approach with potential to identify patients with CAD

July 26, 2019

BOSTON - Coronary artery disease (CAD) - caused by plaque buildup in the artery walls that constricts the flow of blood to the heart - is the most common form of heart disease and the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. Non-invasive imaging such as cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is often used to diagnose coronary heart disease. However, current techniques are cumbersome, costly and expose patients to adverse health risks.

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have developed a novel imaging approach that has the potential to identify patients with coronary disease without administration of drugs or contrast dye and within a short 15 minute exam protocol. Described in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging, the technique involves measuring changes in blood flow in the myocardium - the heart's muscular tissue - after physical exercise by measuring magnetic properties of the tissue, thereby eliminating the need for any contrast media or pharmacological stress agents.

"Current stress cardiac imaging requires administration of gadolinium contrast agent," said corresponding author Reza Nezafat, PhD, scientific director of the Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Center at BIDMC and a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. "However, recent data have shown that gadolinium deposits in the brain and other organs. We aimed to develop a non-invasive imaging technique that eliminates the need for any contrast administration to measure changes in the blood flow in the myocardium."

To do that, researchers in the Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (MR) Center at BIDMC developed a technique that measures changes in the magnetic property of tissue without gadolinium contrast agent as they performed exercise stress tests.

First, healthy subjects underwent a series of baseline imaging scans. Next, lying on their backs at the opening of an MRI machine, the healthy adults pedaled an exercise bicycle to increase their heart rate. Within 30 seconds of pedaling, participants underwent an MRI scan that measured changes in tissue properties of myocardium to quantify changes in the blood flow in the myocardium.

Next, the researchers tested participants with known or suspected coronary artery disease with a similar imaging protocol. Taken together, images from the two groups revealed that magnetic properties of myocardium change differently in areas impacted by coronary atherosclerosis than in normal areas and that these differences can be quantified using this technique.

"In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrated that a quantitative cardiac MR approach that measures tissue properties of heart muscles, combined with an exercise protocol using an MRI-compatible ergometer in an MRI suite might have the potential to assess flow-limiting coronary artery stenosis in patients with suspected CAD without the need for gadolinium contrast injection or pharmacological stress agents," Nezefat said. "Larger studies are warranted to confirm the clinical performance of our quantitative cardiac MR approach with exercise stress as an alternative to the currently common method of non-invasive assessment of coronary artery disease."
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In addition to Nezafat, co-authors include Shiro Nakamori, MD, Ahmed ahmy, PhD, Jihye Jang, MSc, Hossam El-Rewaidy, MSc, Ulf Neisius, MD, Sophie Berg, RN, Beth Goddu, RT, Patrick Pierce, RT, Jennifer Rodriguez, BA, Thomas Hauser, MD, Long Ngo, PhD and Warren Manning, MD - all of BIDMC.

Dr. Nakamori is supported by a scholarship from Mie University Foundation International. Dr. Nezafat is supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (R01HL129185, R01HL127015, R01HL129157, and AHA 15EIA22710040). All other authors have reported that they have no relationships relevant to the contents of this paper to disclose.

About Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center is a patient care, teaching and research affiliate of Harvard Medical School and consistently ranks as a national leader among independent hospitals in National Institutes of Health funding.

BIDMC is in the community with Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital-Milton, Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital-Needham, Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital-Plymouth, Anna Jaques Hospital, Cambridge Health Alliance, Lawrence General Hospital, Signature Healthcare, Beth Israel Deaconess HealthCare, Community Care Alliance and Atrius Health. BIDMC is also clinically affiliated with the Joslin Diabetes Center and Hebrew Rehabilitation Center and is a research partner of Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center and the Jackson Laboratory. BIDMC is the official hospital of the Boston Red Sox. For more information, visit http://www.bidmc.org.

BIDMC is part of Beth Israel Lahey Health, a new health care system that brings together academic medical centers and teaching hospitals, community and specialty hospitals, more than 4,000 physicians and 35,000 employees in a shared mission to expand access to great care and advance the science and practice of medicine through groundbreaking research and education.

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

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