US Senate increases microbicide funding for a total of $42 million

July 27, 2005

Washington, DC (July 27, 2005) - In a show of increasing support for one of the most promising technologies currently in development in the fight against AIDS, the Senate approved $42 million for USAID to continue research and development of microbicides for FY 2006. The sum is a $12 million increase over the 2005 level, and $6 million above the amount approved by the House for FY 06. $4 million of the increase is designated for the International Partnership for Microbicides, with the remainder going to other USAID supported NGOs conducting trials of several promising microbicide candidates. USAID is currently funding four Phase III clinical trials to study the effectiveness of potential microbicides.

Microbicides are being developed to come in a variety of forms, including gels, creams, rings or a suppository, and would be used to reduce the risk of HIV transmission. A microbicide would offer additional support when used with a condom, but most importantly, microbicides hope to give women a tool to protect themselves when they are unable to negotiate condom use or ensure mutual monogamy with their partners.

Polly Harrison, Director of the Alliance for Microbicide Development said, " We've come a long way over the past decade, thanks to the efforts of many dedicated scientists, advocates, and the leadership of Representatives Jim Kolbe (R-AZ) and Nita Lowey (D-NY) in the House, and a growing number of committed Senators, especially Senators Patrick Leahy (D-Vermont), Jon Corzine (D-NJ), Barack Obama (D-IL) and Olympia Snowe (R-ME)."

"The feminization of the epidemic calls for a comprehensive approach to HIV/AIDS that includes behavior change strategies for prevention, treatment and care, as well as research into new prevention technologies that women can initiate and control, such as microbicides," said Lori Heise, Director of the Global Campaign for Microbicides.

Of the 14,000 people infected with HIV daily worldwide, half are women. In the United States, girls make up the majority of all new HIV infections among teenagers, with most acquiring the virus through heterosexual intercourse.

The microbicide field has built an extraordinary amount of scientific momentum, with several first-generation candidates entering large-scale human trials around the world. At the same time, new products, based upon recent advances in HIV treatment, are already well into safety trials. Given current scientific advancements, an effective microbicide could be developed by the end of the decade, and once available, could well change the course of the AIDS epidemic.
-end-
The Alliance for Microbicide Development is a global, multidisciplinary, multisectoral coalition founded to accelerate development of microbicides to prevent HIV/AIDS through advocacy, communication, convening, and addressing critical problems in practice and policy. http://www.microbicide.org

The Global Campaign for Microbicides is an international movement of activists, citizens and non-profit organizations dedicated to accelerating access to new HIV prevention tools, especially for women. The Campaign works to ensure that as science proceeds, the interests of users, trial participants and communities are fully represented and respected. http://www.global-campaign.org

Rational PR

Related Aids Articles from Brightsurf:

Developing a new vaccination strategy against AIDS
Infection researchers from the German Primate Center (DPZ) -- Leibniz Institute for Primate Research have in cooperation with international colleagues tested a new vaccination strategy against the HIV-related simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in rhesus monkeys.

HIV-AIDS: Following your gut
Researchers find a way to reduce replication of the AIDS virus in the gastrointestinal tract.

A path toward ending AIDS in the US by 2025
Using prevention surveillance data to model rates of HIV incidence, prevalence and mortality, investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health set targets, specifically a decrease in new infections to 21,000 by 2020 and to 12,000 by 2025, that would mark a transition toward ending the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

What does it take for an AIDS virus to infect a person?
Researchers examined the characteristics of HIV-1 strains that were successful in traversing the genital mucosa that forms a boundary to entry by viruses and bacteria.

How AIDS conquered North America
A new technique that allowed researchers to analyze genetic material from serum samples of HIV patients taken before AIDS was known provides a glimpse of unprecedented detail into the beginnings of the AIDS epidemic in North America.

New research could help build better hearing aids
Scientists at Binghamton University, State University of New York want to improve sensor technology critical to billions of devices made every year.

NY State Department of Health AIDS Institute funds HIV/AIDS prevention in high-risk youth
NewYork-Presbyterian's Comprehensive Health Program and Project STAY, an initiative of the Harlem Heath Promotion Center (HHPC) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health has received two grants totaling more than $3.75 million from the New York State Department of Health AIDS Institute for their continued efforts to prevent HIV/AIDS in at-risk youth.

A new way to nip AIDS in the bud
When new HIV particles bud from an infected cell, the enzyme protease activates to help the viruses infect more cells.

AIDS research prize for Warwick academic
A researcher at the University of Warwick has received international recognition for his contribution to AIDS research.

Insects inspire next generation of hearing aids
An insect-inspired microphone that can tackle the problem of locating sounds and eliminate background noise is set to revolutionize modern-day hearing aid systems.

Read More: Aids News and Aids Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.