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NYU among Nature Index's 2016 Rising Stars

July 27, 2016

New York University has been named among the 2016 "Rising Stars" by Nature Index, a database of research articles published in a group of 68 high-quality science journals.

NYU ranked 25th among institutions in North America that have posted the greatest increases--from 2012 to 2015--in authored or co-authored papers appearing in the Nature Index's journals; these publications include Current Biology, Nature Neuroscience, Science, and Physical Review Letters, among others.

The rankings, part of the Nature Index 2016 Rising Stars supplement, appear in the July 28 issue of Nature.

"By identifying these rising stars, we're given an insight into which new emerging institutions are likely to play a role in addressing some of the globe's most pressing challenges," says David Swinbanks, founder of the Nature Index.

Research by NYU scientists appearing in Nature Index journals during the studied period includes the following:
  • The identification of how brain rhythms are used to process music, a finding that also shows how our perception of notes and melodies can be used as a method to better understand the auditory system and suggests musical training can enhance the functional role of brain rhythms (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences);
  • A discovery linking changes in the structure of central brain neurons to understanding how animals adjust to changing seasons--results that enhance our comprehension of the mechanisms vital to the regulation of our circadian system, or internal clock (Cell);
  • A method for examining the inner workings of battery-like devices called supercapacitors--a technique, based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that establishes a means for monitoring and potentially enhancing the performance of such items (Nature Communications);
  • A finding that shows microscopic particles that bind under low temperatures will melt as temperatures rise to moderate levels, but re-connect under hotter conditions--research that points to new ways to create "smart materials," which adapt to their environment by taking new forms, and to sharpen the detail of 3D printing (Nature Materials)
-end-
The Nature Index 2016 Rising Stars supplement identifies the countries and institutions showing the most significant growth in high-quality research publications, using Nature Index, which tracks the research of more than 8,000 global institutions. For more on how the Nature Index is calculated, please visit https://www.natureindex.com/faq.

New York University

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