Nav: Home

Professor of Marine Geosciences named 2016 AGU Fellow

July 27, 2016

MIAMI-University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science Professor Peter K. Swart has been elected a fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), the nation's leading professional society for scientists in the Earth and space sciences. The award will be presented at a special award presentation during the 2016 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

A pioneer in marine geochemistry, Swart is chair of the UM Rosenstiel School Department of Marine Geosciences and the Lewis G. Weeks Professor of Marine Geology. Swart, who has been at UM since 1983, is director of UM's Stable Isotope Laboratory, and is best known for his work on isotopes in geochemistry, carbonate diagenesis (physical and chemical changes occurring during the conversion of sediment to sedimentary rock), paleoclimatology, and hydrology.

"I am pleased that Peter is being recognized by AGU for his pioneering geochemistry research," said Roni Avissar, dean of the UM Rosenstiel School. "This is a well-deserved and long-overdue recognition of Peter's achievements."

Swart pioneered the use of geochemistry in other areas such as extra-terrestrial materials, hydrology, and carbonates. His 1982 paper in Science was the first to reveal the presence of highly enriched C-13 phases in meteorites, offering clues to the origin of the solar system.

"To be elected a Union Fellow is a tribute to those AGU members who have made exceptional contributions to Earth and space sciences as valued by their peers and vetted by section and focus group committees," according to AGU.

Throughout his career Swart has been supported through a variety of sources including the National Science Foundation, the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Departments of Energy and Interior, as well as several global corporations. He one of the Principal Investigators in the Comparative Sedimentology Laboratory (CSL), a consortium of petroleum companies, and the former editor of the highly regarded journal Sedimentology. In 2011, his work with UM Rosenstiel School Professors Kenny Broad and Amy Clement on the dating and isotopic analysis of stalagmites to reconstruct past climate changes was featured as part of a cover story in National Geographic.

Swart is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Geological Society of America. He is also a member of the American Geophysical Union, the Coral Reef Society, the Geological Society of America and the Geochemical Society and the International Association of Sedimentologists.

Swart has an impressive record of scholarly accomplishments, with more than 190 published papers, book chapters, editorials, and special publications that have garnered over 5,000 citations. He also teaches regularly and has served as Ph.D. and Master's dissertation committee chair for more than 30 students.
-end-
About the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School

The University of Miami is one of the largest private research institutions in the southeastern United States. The University's mission is to provide quality education, attract and retain outstanding students, support the faculty and their research, and build an endowment for University initiatives. Founded in the 1940's, the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science has grown into one of the world's premier marine and atmospheric research institutions. Offering dynamic interdisciplinary academics, the Rosenstiel School is dedicated to helping communities to better understand the planet, participating in the establishment of environmental policies, and aiding in the improvement of society and quality of life. For more information, visit: http://www.rsmas.miami.edu.

University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Related Geochemistry Articles:

West Virginia groundwater not affected by fracking, but surface water is
Three years of fracking has not contaminated groundwater in northwestern West Virginia, but accidental spills of wastewater from fracked wells may pose a threat to surface water, according to a study led by scientists at Duke University.
The moon is older than scientists thought, UCLA-led research team reports
he moon is much older than some scientists believe, a UCLA-led research team reports in the journal Science Advances Jan.
EARTH: Why is a gallon of gas cheaper than a gallon of milk?
Robert L. Fares explores what causes the cost of gallon of milk to be so much higher than a gallon of gas.
Professor of Marine Geosciences named 2016 AGU Fellow
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science Professor Peter K.
Huge helium discovery 'a life-saving find'
A new approach to gas exploration has discovered a huge helium gas field, which could address the increasingly critical shortage of this vital yet rare element.
Goldschmidt -- the world's major geochemistry conference
Goldschmidt2016, the world's major geochemistry congress, is due to take place in Yokohama, Japan, from June 26-July 1, 2016.
Oxygen key to containing coal ash contamination
The level of oxygen in a coal ash disposal site can greatly affect how much toxic selenium and arsenic can be leached from the system.
Scientists discover how gypsum forms -- and how it might tell us more about water on Mars
A new explanation of how gypsum forms may change the way we process this important building material, as well as allow us to interpret past water availability on other planets such as Mars.
This week from AGU: Blogs from #AGU15, ocean sounds & winds, & 5 new research papers
A new analysis helps consumers choose which appliances to swap for more efficient models and save money in the process, with some surprising results.
Moscow State University is creating technologies to develop the oil deposits of 'Bashneft'
Moscow State University is creating new technologies for the development of oil deposits of 'Bashneft'.

Related Geochemistry Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...