'The Ecology and Conservation of Seasonally Dry Forests in Asia'

July 28, 2011

Seasonally dry forests are the most widespread type of forest remaining in South and Southeast Asia. For many endangered species, such as tigers, elephants, deer, and primates, this unique habitat is central to their survival. The forests are also intimately linked to humans in the region, who have lived in and relied on them for centuries.

Despite the importance of seasonally dry forests, little is known of their ecology.

The Ecology and Conservation of Seasonally Dry Forests in Asia, published by Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press, explores these unique ecosystems, and the animals, plants, and people that inhabit them.

The chapters in this volume, edited by William McShea, biologist at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute; Stuart Davies of the Center for Tropical Forest Science-Smithsonian Institution Global Earth Observatory Program; and Naris Bhumpakphan of Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand, draw connections between forests, endangered species, and agricultural communities in the region.

Contributors to this book, many of whom are in-country researchers and managers who have spent years studying this ecosystem, provide an overview of the ecology and conservation of seasonally dry forests in Asia.

The book also includes case studies for the conservation of species dependent on these ecosystems, such as tigers, elephants, deer, banteng, and gibbons, and discussions outlining the effective management and conservation of seasonally dry forests.
-end-


Smithsonian

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