Nav: Home

Severity of kyphosis and decline in lung function: The Framingham study

July 28, 2016

BOSTON--July 28, 2016-- Researchers from the Harvard affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research (IFAR), have published a recent article in Journals of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, suggesting that preventing or slowing progression of hyperkyphosis may reduce pulmonary decline in older adults. Hyperkyphosis is a poorly understood condition that causes an extreme forward curvature of the spine and affects as many as 20 to 40 percent of older individuals. "Clinically, we know hyperkyphosis restricts expansion of the lungs and causes difficulty in breathing, as well as other serious health problems," said Amanda Lorbergs, a post-doctoral scientist at IFAR and lead author of the study. Lisa Samelson, senior investigator for the study and associate scientist at IFAR and assistant professor at Harvard Medical School, added, "Our findings are highly important, because they are based on pulmonary function data collected in a prospective cohort followed over a long period, allowing us, for the first time, to quantify the impact of hyperkyphosis on declines in lung function."

Samelson's team used data from the Framingham Heart Study that has collected information from generations of Framingham residents and their offspring since the 1940s. These data include measurements of kyphosis from spine radiographs taken at the beginning of the study and pulmonary function (spirometry) tests performed on four occasions over the next 16 years. The researchers found that women who had the most severe kyphosis had the greatest declines in lung function. Moreover, this loss of lung function that may be due to hyperkyphosis is comparable with the amount associated with smoking up to 15 cigarettes per day. Pulmonary impairment is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in older adults. By quantifying the impact hyperkyphosis can have on pulmonary impairment, this study highlights the importance of developing approaches to prevent or reduce hyperkyphosis.
-end-
This study was supported by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging grant numbers R01 AG041658 and R01 AR041398. A.L. Lorbergs is supported by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging training grant T32-AG023480 Framingham contract number HHSN268201500001I.

About Institute for Aging Research

Scientists at the Institute for Aging Research seek to transform the human experience of aging by conducting research that will ensure a life of health, dignity and productivity into advanced age. The Institute carries out rigorous studies that discover the mechanisms of age-related disease and disability; lead to the prevention, treatment and cure of disease; advance the standard of care for older people; and inform public decision-making. The Musculoskeletal Center within IFAR studies conditions affecting bone, muscle, and joint health with aging.

About Hebrew SeniorLife

Hebrew SeniorLife, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School, is a national senior services leader uniquely dedicated to rethinking, researching and redefining the possibilities of aging. Based in Boston, the non-profit, non-sectarian organization has provided communities and health care for seniors, research into aging, and education for geriatric care providers since 1903. For more information about Hebrew SeniorLife, visit http://www.hebrewseniorlife.org, follow us on Twitter @H_SeniorLife, like us on Facebook or read our blog.

Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research

Related Lung Function Articles:

Lung function decline accelerates in menopausal women
Menopausal women appear to experience an accelerated decline in lung function, according to new research published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
Using lung function tests to diagnose COPD can help patients and reduce health care costs
Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease would benefit if pulmonary function testing was used more consistently to diagnose the condition, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Physical activity may help preserve lung function in individuals with asthma
In a study of adults with asthma, active individuals had slightly less lung function decline than inactive individuals.
Artificial intelligence could improve diagnostic power of lung function tests
Artificial intelligence could improve the interpretation of lung function tests for the diagnosis of long-term lung diseases, according to the findings of a new study.
Elimination of senescent cells improves lung function in mice
In this issue of JCI Insight, Masataka Sugimoto and colleagues at the Juntendo University School of Medicine in Tokyo examined the role of cellular senescence in aging lungs, as there is a well-documented decrease in lung function with age.
Severity of kyphosis and decline in lung function: The Framingham study
Researchers from the Harvard affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research, have published a recent article in Journals of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, suggesting that preventing or slowing progression of hyperkyphosis may reduce pulmonary decline in older adults.
Lung function may affect vocal health for women
Vocal fatigue is a common complaint among teachers and one of the most debilitating conditions that can lead to vocal damage.
Hydroxyurea improves lung function in children with sickle cell disease
For the first time, researchers were able to demonstrate that children diagnosed with sickle cell disease showed improvement in lung function after treatment with hydroxyurea, a treatment that is underused despite its demonstrated benefits.
Exacerbations of COPD accelerate lung-function loss
Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) accelerate the loss of lung function especially among patients with mild disease, according to researchers at National Jewish Health and other institutions.
Being fit may slow lung function decline as we age
Being fit may reduce the decline in lung function that occurs as we grow older, according to research presented at the ATS 2016 International Conference.

Related Lung Function Reading:

Lung Function Tests Made Easy
by Robert J. Shiner MRCS FRCP FRCPC (Author), Joerg Steier MD(D) PhD (UK) (Author)

McGraw-Hill's Pocket Guide to Lung Function Tests, 2nd Edition
by Bob Hancox (Author), Ken Whyte (Author)

Interpreting Lung Function Tests: A Step-by Step Guide
by Bruce R. Thompson (Author), Brigitte M. Borg (Author), Robyn E. O'Hehir (Author)

Pocket Tutor: Understanding Abgs and Lung Function Tests
by Muhunthan Thillai (Author), Keith Hattotuwa (Author)

Lung Function Testing in the 21st Century: Methodologies and Tools Bridging Engineering to Clinical Practice
by Academic Press

Lung Function in Children and Adolescents: Methods, reference values (Progress in Respiratory Research, Vol. 22)
by A. Zapletal (Author), F.J.F. Herth (Series Editor)

Lung Function: Physiology, Measurement and Application in Medicine
by John E. Cotes (Author), David J. Chinn (Author), Martin R. Miller (Author)

Lung Function Tests: Physiological Principles and Clinical Applications
by John M. B. Hughes MD PhD (Author), Neil B. Pride MD FRCP (Author), N.B. Price (Author)

Pulmonary Function Tests in Clinical Practice
by Ali Altalag (Author), Jeremy Road (Author), Pearce Wilcox (Author)

A Simple Guide to The Lung and Its Function (What You Need To Breathe) (A Simple Guide to Medical Conditions)

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Approaching With Kindness
We often forget to say the words "thank you." But can those two words change how you — and those around you — look at the world? This hour, TED speakers on the power of gratitude and appreciation. Guests include author AJ Jacobs, author and former baseball player Mike Robbins, Dr. Laura Trice, Professor of Management Christine Porath, and former Danish politician Özlem Cekic.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#509 Anisogamy: The Beginning of Male and Female
This week we discuss how the sperm and egg came to be, and how a difference of reproductive interest has led to sexual conflict in bed bugs. We'll be speaking with Dr. Geoff Parker, an evolutionary biologist credited with developing a theory to explain the evolution of two sexes, about anisogamy, sexual reproduction through the fusion of two different gametes: the egg and the sperm. Then we'll speak with Dr. Roberto Pereira, research scientist in urban entomology at the University of Florida, about traumatic insemination in bed bugs.