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Age-related differences in nasopharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 levels in patients with COVID-19

July 30, 2020

What The Study Did: Age-related differences in nasopharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 levels in patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 were investigated in this observational study.

Authors: Taylor Heald-Sargent, M.D., Ph.D., of the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.3651)

Editor's Note: The article contains conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflict of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.

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Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release.

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JAMA Pediatrics

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