47th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy

July 31, 2007

Press registration is available online for the American Society for Microbiology's 47th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) being held September 17-20, 2007 in Chicago, Illinois.

Known as the preeminent world meeting for presenting new information on clinical and basic research in infectious diseases and anti-infective therapy, ICAAC has also traditionally served as a forum for the introduction of new antimicrobial agents. This year's ICAAC will attract approximately 9,500 attendees from the United States and abroad and over 130 exhibitors are expected to display the latest in research, equipment, products and publications in the field.

Members of the media are invited to attend and comprehensive media facilities will be available. All media representatives must be registered to attend sessions; registration is limited to a maximum of three individuals from a single media outlet. Please note that videotaping in session rooms, the exhibit hall and post sessions is not allowed.

Journalists interested in attending can register online at http://www.icaac.org/registration.asp. The pre-registration/housing deadline is August 17, 2007. As the ICAAC housing block often sells out quickly and far in advance of the housing deadline, journalists are strongly encouraged to pre-register as early as possible.

The press room will be open for registration from 12 noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday, September 16 and sessions begin on Monday morning. An opening press briefing has been tentatively scheduled for 12 noon on Monday, September 17.
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For more information contact Garth Hogan at (202-942-9389) or e-mail at ghogan@asmusa.org or Jim Sliwa at (202-942-9297) or e-mail at jsliwa@asmusa.org.

American Society for Microbiology

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