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845-Page analytical report on the longevity industry in the UK released

July 31, 2018

Tuesday, July 31, 2018, London, UK: The Biogerontology Research Foundation announces the publication of a new analytical report titled Longevity Industry in UK Landscape Overview 2018. 845 pages in length, the report aims to outline the history, present state and future of the Longevity Industry in the United Kingdom, profiling hundreds of companies, investors, and trends, and offering guidance on the most optimal ways in which UK longevity industry stakeholders, as well as government officials, can work to strengthen the industry, and allow it to reach its full potential as a global longevity science and preventive medicine hub.

The report uses comprehensive infographics to distill the report's data and conclusions into easily understandable portions, and interested readers can get a quick understanding of the report's main findings and conclusions in its 10-page executive summary.

This special regional case study follows-up on the content and general outline of the Longevity Industry made by our consortium in the previous Longevity Industry Landscape Overviews, including Volume I "The Science of Longevity" (750 pages), and Volume II "The Business of Longevity" (650 pages), published earlier this year.

These ongoing analytical reports are part of a collaborative project by The Global Longevity Consortium, consisting of the Biogerontology Research Foundation, Deep Knowledge Analytics, Aging Analytics Agency and the Longevity.International platform.

The report seeks to document what makes the UK fertile ground for a global Longevity industry hub, and how that ground could be developed. The UK is an undoubtable world leader in both the finance and FinTech industries. There is growing evidence that it will become a global hub for AI, in the form of both an exponentially growing UK-based AI industry, as well as in the form of government initiatives which have prioritised development of Artificial Intelligence industry. Indeed, the UK government announced Grand Challenges poised to transform the nation's future, which will be treated as priority areas of national development: Artificial Intelligence and The Ageing Society are among them.

If the UK government would apply a strategy for the synergetic development of these two industries, especially on the front of applying AI to preventive medicine and primary care, then United Kingdom would be in an excellent position to reap many synergetic resulting from the convergence of these two spheres, i.e. AI and Longevity, increasing healthy lifespans while decreasing the economic burden of The Aging Society.

Even more importantly, it is clear from our analysis both in the UK and globally, that the spheres of Finance, AI and Longevity, while most often being considered as separate industries with fairly little overlap, should in fact be more appropriately considered in combination and convergence. Our previous report, Global Longevity Industry Landscape Overview Volume II: "The Business of Longevity", concluded that Longevity Industry does not consist solely of biomedicine, but that P3 Medicine (precision preventive personalised), the AgeTech market and the financial industry are also crucial subsectors of the Longevity industry, given the significant impact that societal ageing and Longevity have upon economies in general and the economic burden of healthcare, pension funds and insurance companies in particular, as well as the fact that multiple types of financial entities have the potential to tie their performance to quantitative measures of healthy longevity like HALY and QALY in order to help economies thrive in response to an increase in its citizens healthy longevity.

One of the strongest conclusions to come out of this report is that the United Kingdom has enough resources in each of three most crucial sectors - Longevity, Artificial Intelligence and Financial Industry - to be in a strong position to succeed; nonetheless, the nation should focus on cross-sector collaboration and synergetic convergence, to accelerate innovation and progress in the Longevity industry at scale.

About the Biogerontology Research Foundation:

The Biogerontology Research Foundation is a UK non-profit research foundation and public policy center seeking to fill a gap within the research community, whereby the current scientific understanding of the ageing process is not yet being sufficiently exploited to produce effective medical interventions. The BGRF funds and conducts research which, building on the body of knowledge about how ageing happens, aims to develop biotechnological interventions to remediate the molecular and cellular deficits which accumulate with age and which underlie the ill-health of old age. Addressing ageing damage at this most fundamental level will provide an important opportunity to produce the effective, lasting treatments for the diseases and disabilities of ageing, required to improve quality of life in the elderly. The BGRF seeks to use the entire scope of modern biotechnology to attack the changes that take place in the course of ageing, and to address not just the symptoms of age-related diseases but also the mechanisms of those diseases.
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Biogerontology Research Foundation

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