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Research suggests coffee consumption associated with reduced risk of death

July 31, 2018

A new roundtable report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC) titled 'Coffee, caffeine, mortality and life expectancy' highlights the potential role of coffee consumption on all-cause mortality, examining both published and yet-to-be published research to date.

Roundtable delegates including academics, healthcare professionals and dietitians from across six European countries met to discuss the most recent research into coffee and life expectancy, and the potential mechanisms behind an association with reduced risk of all-cause mortality. The roundtable, held at the Royal Society of Medicine in London, was chaired by Sian Porter RD MBDA (Consultant Dietitian and spokesperson for The British Dietetic Association, UK).

Roundtable speaker Professor Miguel Martínez-González (University of Navarra, Spain; Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health) presented unpublished original research studying a cohort of almost 20,000 participants over an average of ten years. Professor Martínez-González's research suggests that coffee consumption at intakes of 3-6 cups of coffee a day reduces all-cause mortality. Within this cohort, there was a 22% lower risk of all-cause mortality for each two additional cups of coffee per day.

During the roundtable, potential mechanisms behind coffee consumption and reduced all-cause mortality were discussed. It was suggested that caffeine alone was unlikely to explain the effect on mortality, mentioning a potential role for polyphenols found in coffee, which may have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

Key research findings highlighted in the roundtable report include:
  • Meta-analyses have suggested that coffee consumption versus no coffee consumption is associated with an up to 17% risk reduction of all-cause mortality1-6
  • A study by Imperial College London and IARC found that participants with the highest consumption of coffee had a lower risk of all-causes of death7
  • A study from the US found that participants who consumed a cup of coffee a day were 12% less likely to die compared to those who didn't drink coffee8
Sian Porter, Consultant Dietitian and spokesperson for the British Dietetic Association, UK, said: "Data on cause of death and years lived combined with life expectancy data can be a useful way to understand the general population's health, and is research frequently examined by health organisations to help inform policy to guide people towards healthier diets and lifestyles. The growing body of research on coffee consumption and all-cause mortality presents new data for consideration, although more evidence is needed to understand the association and mechanisms behind the results."

The current peer-reviewed body of research on coffee consumption and all-cause mortality was discussed at the roundtable in the context of how coffee may fit into a healthy diet and lifestyle. Delegates questioned how frequently healthcare professionals currently discuss coffee consumption with patients, particularly when dealing with patients at risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) or type 2 diabetes, given the known relationship between coffee consumption and these diseases.
-end-
To read the report titled, 'Coffee, caffeine, mortality and life expectancy', click here.

Readers interested in finding out more about coffee & health can visit: http://www.coffeeandhealth.org

Notes to editors
  • Moderate coffee consumption can be defined as 3-5 cups per day, based on the European Food Safety Authority's review of caffeine safety9.
  • To read a full overview of coffee and life expectancy, click here.
Roundtable delegates
  • Ms Sian Porter, RD MBDA, British Dietetic Association, UK (speaker)
  • Professor Miguel Martínez-González, University of Navarra, Spain (speaker)
  • Professor Arne Astrup, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Dr Ellie Cannon , NHS General Practitioner, UK
  • Dr Maria Benedetta Donati, IRCCS Instituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Italy
  • Dr Guiseppe Grosso, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Policlinico Vittorio Emmanuelle, Italy
  • Dr JW Langer , Medical doctor, author, lecturer and medical journalist, Denmark
  • Dr Maria del Puy Portillo, University of the Basque Country, Spain
  • Dr Elisabet Rothenberg, Kristianstad University, Sweden
  • Dr Raul Zamoea-Ros, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Spain
References

1. Malerba S. et al. (2013) A meta-analysis of prospective studies of coffee consumption and mortality for all causes, cancers and cardiovascular diseases. Eur J Epidemiol, 28(7):527-39.

1. Je Y., Giovannucci E. (2014) Coffee consumption and total mortality: a meta-analysis of twenty prospective cohort studies. Br J Nutr, 111(7):1162-73.

2. Crippa A. et al. (2014) Coffee consumption and mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis. Am J Epidemiol, 180(8):763-75.

2. Zhao Y. et al. (2015) Association of coffee drinking with all-cause mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Public Health Nutr, 18(7):1282-91.

3. Grosso G. et al. (2016) Coffee consumption and mortality in three Eastern European countries: results from the HAPIEE (Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial factors In Eastern Europe) study. Eur J Epidemiol, 31(12):1191-1205.

4. Poole R. et al. (2017) Coffee consumption and health: umbrella review of meta-analyses of multiple health outcomes. BMJ, 359:j5024.

5. Gunter, M.J. et al (2017) Coffee drinking and mortality in 10 European countries. Ann Int Med, 167(4):236-24.

6. Song-Yi Park et al. Association of Coffee Consumption With Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Among Nonwhite Populations. Ann Int Med, 10.7326/M16-2472

7. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) (2015) Scientific Opinion on the safety of caffeine. EFSA Journal, 13(5):4102.

About ISIC

The Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC) is a not-for-profit organization, established in 1990 and devoted to the study and disclosure of science related to "coffee and health." Since 2003 ISIC also supports a pan-European education programme, working in partnership with national coffee associations in nine countries to convey current scientific knowledge on "coffee and health" to health care professionals.

ISIC's activities are focused on:
  • the study of scientific matters related to "coffee and health"
  • the collection and evaluation of studies and scientific information about "coffee and health"
  • the support of independent scientific research on "coffee and health"
  • active dissemination of balanced "coffee and health" scientific research and knowledge to a broad range of stakeholders.
ISIC respects scientific research ethics in all its activities. ISIC's communications are based on sound science and rely on scientific studies derived from peer-reviewed scientific journals and other publications.

ISIC members are six of the major European coffee companies: illycaffè, Jacobs Douwe Egberts, Lavazza, Nestlé, Paulig, and Tchibo.

About coffeeandhealth.org

The website http://www.coffeeandhealth.org is a science-based resource developed for health care and other professional audiences and provides the latest information and research into coffee, caffeine and health. Follow us on twitter: @coffeeandhealth

Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee

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