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Adjustable lordotic expandable vs static lateral lumbar interbody fusion devices

July 31, 2020

The background of this research is based on the use of large interbody spacers in minimally invasive (MIS) lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) that offer favorable clinical and radiographic results. The static interbody spacers are likely to cause iatrogenic endplate damage and implant subsidence due to strong impaction and too much trialing. Whereas expandable interbody spacers with adjustable lordosis offer in situ expansion that bear the potential to optimize endplate contact and maximize and maintain sagittal alignment correction until fusion occurs.

The aim of this study was to understand the clinical and radiographic outcomes amongst patients treated with static and expandable interbody spacers with adjustable lordosis for minimally invasive (MIS) lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF). This research essentially is a multi-surgeon, retrospective, Institutional Review Board-exempt chart review of those patients who underwent MIS LLIF at 1-2 contiguous level(s) using either a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) static or a titanium expandable spacer with adjustable lordosis. The researchers collected the mean differences of radiographic and clinical functional outcomes and compared from preoperative up to 12-month postoperative follow-up.

The result of the study showed significant positive clinical and radiographic outcomes for patients who underwent MIS LLIF using titanium expandable interbody spacers with adjustable lordosis.
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This article is Open Access and can be retrieved from the following link: https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/TOORTHJ-14-60

Bentham Science Publishers

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