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Minimally invasive percutaneous treatment for osteoid osteoma of the spine

July 31, 2020

This research defines the new mini-invasive technique for the treatment of osteoid osteomas, which are benign but painful bone-forming tumors that usually involve long bones, with 10-20% of the cases having localization at the spine.

The most common symptom in osteoid osteomas is back pain which is generally responding to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but in some cases, also radicular pain can be present. The best treatment, for years, has been known to be surgical excision for cases with unresponsive pain. It has been practiced with much success but it also has a high rate of fusion with instrumentation.

In the recent years, percutaneous radiofrequency ablation has been suggested as a new mini-invasive technique for the treatment of osteoid osteomas.
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This article is Open Access and can be retrieved from the following link: https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/TONEUJ-14-41

Bentham Science Publishers

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