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These tiny satellites could take on NASA's riskiest missions (video)

August 01, 2016

WASHINGTON, July 28, 2016 -- At the Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, California, NASA is preparing tiny satellites the size of briefcases for a mission to Mars. Called CubeSats, swarms of these small marvels could potentially take on NASA's riskiest missions -- think exploring the surface of Venus or the volcanoes of Io -- at a lower cost than full-size, multi-instrument satellites. Matt Davenport and JPL Chief Engineer for Interplanetary Small Spacecraft Andrew Klesh geek out on CubeSats in the latest Speaking of Chemistry episode. Watch the video here: https://youtu.be/OGmiv53La0o.
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Speaking of Chemistry is a production of Chemical & Engineering News, a weekly magazine of the American Chemical Society. It's the series that keeps you up to date with the important and fascinating chemistry shaping the world around you. Subscribe to the series at http://bit.ly/ACSReactions, and follow us on Twitter @CENMag.

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