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Primary liver carcinoma may be misclassified based solely on major imaging features

August 01, 2016

A study released in the July 2016 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology found that biphenotypic primary liver carcinoma (also called hepatocholangiocarcinoma) may be misclassified as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) if interpretation is based on major imaging features alone.

"Most of these malignancies have at least one ancillary feature that may allow them to be correctly classified as a non-HCC malignancy. The results of our study support the importance of a more comprehensive algorithm for liver lesion assessment, such as Liver Imaging Reporting and Data Systems (LI-RADS)," said study lead author Theodora A. Potretzke, formerly of the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University, St. Louis and now at Mayo Clinic Rochester.

Titled, "Imaging Features of Biphenotypic Primary Liver Carcinoma (Hepatocholangiocarcinoma) and the Potential to Mimic Hepatocellular Carcinoma: LI-RADS Analysis of CT and MRI Features in 61 Cases," the study is based on a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database of all pathologically proven cases of biphenotypic primary liver carcinoma treated at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology between 2006 and 2014.

In the study, LI-RADS was accurate for classifying most of the biphenotypic primary liver carcinomas as non-HCC malignancy, in large part because of the inclusion of ancillary features, such as peripheral arterial phase hyperenhancement. Through evaluation of major features alone, 33 of 61 (54.1%) lesions met the criteria for HCC and therefore might have been misclassified, the study said.

"Our study provided valuable information regarding the frequency of major and ancillary features of biphenotypic primary liver carcinoma. That a substantial percentage of lesions met strictly applied major feature criteria for HCC raises concern that the use of imaging algorithms that do not account for ancillary features may lead to misdiagnosis in some instances," Potretzke said.
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The study's abstract may be viewed here, while the July 2016 issue AJR of AJR may be accessed here.

Founded in 1900, ARRS is the first and oldest radiology society in the United States, and is an international forum for progress in radiology. The Society's mission is to improve health through a community committed to advancing knowledge and skills in radiology. ARRS achieves its mission through an annual scientific and educational meeting, publication of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) and InPractice magazine, topical symposia and webinars, and print and online educational materials. ARRS is located in Leesburg, VA.

American Roentgen Ray Society

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