Nav: Home

Heating the exterior of suitcases may decrease the spread of bed bugs through luggage

August 01, 2016

New research indicates that brief heat treatment is a promising way to decrease the spread of bed bugs being transported on the outer surface of luggage.

When soft-sided suitcases with male bed bugs on the outside were exposed to an air temperature of 70-75oC, it took only six minutes to kill all of the bed bugs, even those that had concealed themselves under zipper flaps or decorative piping. During heating, only one bed bug (out of 250 total) moved into the luggage (through a closed zipper). Also, at room temperature, only three percent of bugs placed on the outside of the suitcases had moved inside during a 24-hour period.

"Heat has attracted a lot of interest as a control method for bed bugs because it is effective and environmentally benign, but it can take a lot of time for heat to thoroughly penetrate a piece of furniture or a suitcase and increase the temperature at the location of the hidden bed bugs inside," said Dr. Catherine Loudon, author of the Pest Management Science article. "Bed bugs located on the outside of luggage are one of the few cases in which they are somewhat peripherally constrained and therefore more vulnerable to a quick exposure of heat."
-end-


Wiley

Related Bed Bugs Articles:

People who go to bed late have less control over OCD symptoms
A late bedtime is associated with lower perceived control of obsessive thoughts, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
Bed bug awareness poor among US travelers, but reactions are strong
Most US travelers can't identify a bed bug, and yet the pest evokes a stronger response than any other potential hotel-room deficiency -- putting the hospitality industry in a difficult spot.
Bed partners may unintentionally contribute to the perpetuation of insomnia
Preliminary results from a new study show that partners of people who have insomnia may try to be supportive by engaging in a range of behaviors that unintentionally contradict treatment recommendations.
Bed bugs: Proactive pest management critical in multi-unit housing
Amid the persistent threat of bed bug infestations in multi-unit housing, the best advice for property owners, managers, and tenants looking to avoid the pests is the same advice that applies to many other afflictions: an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
Some bed bugs show early signs of resistance to 2 common insecticides
Pest management professionals battling the ongoing resurgence of bed bugs are wise to employ a well-rounded set of measures that reduces reliance on chemical control, as new research shows the early signs of resistance developing among bed bugs to two commonly used insecticides, chlorfenapyr and bifenthrin.
Some bed bugs are better climbers than others
Not all bed bugs are created equal, and some of the leading bed bug traps used by pest management professionals are ineffective against species with better climbing abilities than others.
Corralling stink bugs could lead to better wine
To wine makers, stink bugs are more than a nuisance.
Cycling in bed is safe for ICU patients: Hamilton study
Researchers at McMaster University and St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton have demonstrated that physiotherapists can safely start in-bed cycling sessions with critically ill, mechanically ventilated patients early on in their ICU stay.
Can you bounce water balloons off a bed of nails? Yes, says new study
A group of first year students at Roskilde University, supervised by Dr.
Nurses' scrubs often contaminated with bad bugs
ICU nurses' scrubs often are contaminated by bad bugs spread from the patient or surfaces in the room, finds an IDWeek 2016 study.

Related Bed Bugs Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#529 Do You Really Want to Find Out Who's Your Daddy?
At least some of you by now have probably spit into a tube and mailed it off to find out who your closest relatives are, where you might be from, and what terrible diseases might await you. But what exactly did you find out? And what did you give away? In this live panel at Awesome Con we bring in science writer Tina Saey to talk about all her DNA testing, and bioethicist Debra Mathews, to determine whether Tina should have done it at all. Related links: What FamilyTreeDNA sharing genetic data with police means for you Crime solvers embraced...