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HPV vaccine found safe in girls and women with autoimmune diseases

August 01, 2016

In a recent study of girls and women diagnosed with at least one autoimmune disease, vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) did not increase the risk of developing another autoimmune disease. In fact, being vaccinated was associated with a slightly reduced risk compared with not being vaccinated.

The study included all 70,265 girls and women between 10 and 30 years of age in Sweden in 2006 to 2010 diagnosed with an autoimmune disease.

Dr. Lisen Arnheim-Dahlstrom, senior author of the Journal of Internal Medicine study, noted that individuals with autoimmune disease are vulnerable to vaccine-preventable diseases.
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Wiley

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