Nav: Home

UC study examines opioid prescribing and practices in Ohio emergency departments

August 01, 2017

CINCINNATI -- A survey led by a team of researchers at the University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center reports that the majority of Ohio's emergency department (ED) administrators and physicians are in support of the most recent state guidelines for prescribing opioids, but challenges still exist in implementation.

"This is a comprehensive look at how ED administrators perceive the role of state guidelines," says principal investigator Neil MacKinnon, PhD, dean of UC's James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy, noting that the survey results will be presented to the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) in September 2017.

In the survey, the UC research team queried 163 Ohio hospital administrators and ED physicians to determine the extent and level of adoption of the 2014 Ohio Emergency and Acute Care Facility Opioids and Other Controlled Substances (OOCS) prescribing guidelines and to garner feedback and recommendations for improvements that would assist with implementation.

"In response to the growing opioid epidemic in Ohio, we have one of the nation's most aggressive and comprehensive approaches to address opioid addiction and overdose deaths, including a strong focus on preventing the non-medical use of prescription drugs, which led to the OOCS guidelines," says MacKinnon.

According to the report, responses from 150 hospitals were obtained (a 92 percent response rate), and of those respondents 112 either had an OOCS prescribing policy, were adopting one or were already implementing guidelines without a specific policy. Per the report, the OOCS guidelines are designed to urge emergency department prescribers to first consider non-opioid therapies, avoid using opioids for chronic pain, and to encourage prescribers to check Ohio's prescription drug monitoring program, the Ohio Automated Rx Reporting System (OARRS), for prior opioid prescriptions.

Survey participants, however, did identify barriers to guideline adherence such as frustrations in navigating the OARRS software fields and the complex relationship between how the refusal of pain medications reflects in patient satisfaction scores, which impacts both the hospital and physician performance ratings.

"Clearly a coordinated, system-level response is required and there is much work left to do," says co-investigator Michael Lyons, MD, associate professor of emergency medicine at the UC College of Medicine.

While there is evidence that rates of opioid prescribing are decreasing, Lyons says the survey also shows that not all hospitals are engaged to the same degree.

The survey was commissioned and funded by the Ohio Department of Health and is available online. A complete list of the team members is contained in the report.
-end-
If you would like to be removed from our mailing list, have received this message in error or would like to update or add an email address, please email uchealthnews@uc.edu.

University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Related Emergency Department Articles:

Emergency department admissions of children for sexual abuse
This study analyzed emergency department admissions of children for sexual abuse between 2010 and 2016 using a nationwide database of emergency visits and US Census Bureau data.
30-day death rates after emergency department visits
Researchers used Medicare data from 2009 to 2016 to see how 30-day death rates associated with emergency department visits have changed.
Preventing smoking -- evidence from urban emergency department patients
A new study from the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation offers a more in-depth understanding of smoking among patients in an urban emergency department.
When a freestanding emergency department comes to town, costs go up
Rather than functioning as substitutes for hospital-based emergency departments, freestanding emergency departments have increased local market spending on emergency care in three of four states' markets where they have entered, according to a new paper by experts at Rice University.
Emoji buttons gauge emergency department sentiments in real time
Simple button terminals stationed around emergency departments featuring 'emoji' reflecting a range of emotions are effective in monitoring doctor and patient sentiments in real time.
Is caregiver depression associated with more emergency department visits by patients with dementia?
An observational study of 663 caregivers and the patients with dementia they care for suggests caregiver depression is associated with increased emergency department visits for their patients.
Physical and mental illnesses combined increase emergency department visits
People with both physical illnesses and mental disorders visit the emergency department more frequently than people with multiple physical illnesses or mental illness alone, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Reducing overtesting in the emergency department could save millions
A new study finds there's excessive imaging testing being performed in the emergency department.
Canadian pediatric emergency department crowding not linked to death, serious adverse outcomes
Visiting a crowded pediatric emergency department in Canada may increase the likelihood of being hospitalized but is not linked to delayed hospitalization or death in children, according to research in CMAJ.
Obese children over a third more likely to require a hospital emergency department visit
New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Glasgow, Scotland (April 28-May 1) reveals that obese children are over a third more likely to require a hospital emergency department visit than their normal weight counterparts.
More Emergency Department News and Emergency Department Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

In & Out Of Love
We think of love as a mysterious, unknowable force. Something that happens to us. But what if we could control it? This hour, TED speakers on whether we can decide to fall in — and out of — love. Guests include writer Mandy Len Catron, biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, musician Dessa, One Love CEO Katie Hood, and psychologist Guy Winch.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#543 Give a Nerd a Gift
Yup, you guessed it... it's Science for the People's annual holiday episode that helps you figure out what sciency books and gifts to get that special nerd on your list. Or maybe you're looking to build up your reading list for the holiday break and a geeky Christmas sweater to wear to an upcoming party. Returning are pop-science power-readers John Dupuis and Joanne Manaster to dish on the best science books they read this past year. And Rachelle Saunders and Bethany Brookshire squee in delight over some truly delightful science-themed non-book objects for those whose bookshelves are already full. Since...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab