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NASA satellite finds Jongdari a Tropical Depression

August 01, 2018

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found Tropical Depression Jongdari was still being battered by wind shear.

On Aug. 1 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, or JTWC, noted that Tropical Depression Jongdari was located near 28.8 degrees north latitude and 126.5 degrees east longitude, about 152 nautical miles north-northwest of Kadena Air Base, Japan. 16W had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots (34.5 mph/55.5 kph). It was moving to the south-southwest.

On Aug. 1 at 1:30 a.m. EDT (0530 UTC) the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured visible image of Jongdari over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Convection was diminishing over the low level center of circulation and in the band of thunderstorms south of the center.

The JTWC expects Jongdari to maintain depression status as it moves toward China. A landfall south of Shanghai is expected on early on Aug. 3.
-end-


NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

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