Nav: Home

NASA satellite finds Jongdari a Tropical Depression

August 01, 2018

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found Tropical Depression Jongdari was still being battered by wind shear.

On Aug. 1 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, or JTWC, noted that Tropical Depression Jongdari was located near 28.8 degrees north latitude and 126.5 degrees east longitude, about 152 nautical miles north-northwest of Kadena Air Base, Japan. 16W had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots (34.5 mph/55.5 kph). It was moving to the south-southwest.

On Aug. 1 at 1:30 a.m. EDT (0530 UTC) the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured visible image of Jongdari over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Convection was diminishing over the low level center of circulation and in the band of thunderstorms south of the center.

The JTWC expects Jongdari to maintain depression status as it moves toward China. A landfall south of Shanghai is expected on early on Aug. 3.
-end-


NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related Circulation Articles:

Villous tree model with active contractions for estimating blood flow conditions
Perfusion in the human placenta is an important physiological phenomenon which shows the placental conditions.
Autumn Eurasian snow variability in response to atmospheric circulation
investigate the autumn Eurasian snow variability, intending to provide a better understanding of the factors involved in Eurasian snow changes and their impacts on the wintertime Arctic Oscillation.
Weather patterns' influence on frost timing
The frost-free season in North America is approximately 10 days longer now than it was a century ago.
Mechanism of the influence of the Tibetan-Iranian Plateaus on the circulation and climate in summer
The Iranian-Tibetan Plateaus have both dynamic and thermal influences on Asian climate and global circulation.
NASA watching remnants of ex-Tropical Cyclone Carlos
Tropical Cyclone Carlos became sub-tropical and weakened to a remnant low pressure area over the weekend of Feb.
Decoding ocean signals
Geographer Tim DeVries and colleagues determine why the ocean has absorbed more carbon over the past decade.
RIT engineer researches the impact of shear stress on cell circulation
Jiandi Wan, an assistant professor of microsystems engineering in Rochester Institute of Technology's Kate Gleason College of Engineering, recently received a $476,505 award from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation for his work using fluid dynamics and mechano-biology strategies to better understand blood flow and how cells moving through blood vessels are affected by shear stress
Study finds potential instability in Atlantic Ocean water circulation system
One of the world's largest ocean circulation systems may not be as stable as today's weather models predict, according to a new study.
Innovative technique to examine blood vessels in 3-D help unlock secrets of the brain
A study published today in the Journal of Anatomy has made an important breakthrough in the examination of blood vessels in the brain giving scientists a clearer understanding of how dementia, brain cancer and stroke can affect veins and capillaries in this organ.
Circulation favors placenta over brain in fetuses of diabetic mothers
Blood flows preferentially to the placenta instead of the brain in fetuses of mothers with diabetes, reveals research presented today at EuroEcho-Imaging 2016.

Related Circulation Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#532 A Class Conversation
This week we take a look at the sociology of class. What factors create and impact class? How do we try and study it? How does class play out differently in different countries like the US and the UK? How does it impact the political system? We talk with Daniel Laurison, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Swarthmore College and coauthor of the book "The Class Ceiling: Why it Pays to be Privileged", about class and its impacts on people and our systems.