ATS publishes clinical guideline on obesity hypoventilation syndrome

August 01, 2019

August 1, 2019--The American Thoracic Society has published an official clinical guideline on the evaluation and management of obesity hypoventilation syndrome in the Society's Aug. 1 American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a breathing disorder that affects some people who are obese, causing them to have too much carbon dioxide and too little oxygen in their blood. Medically, OHS is defined by the combination of obesity (body mass index ?30 kg/m2), sleep-disordered breathing and awake daytime hypercapnia (awake resting partial pressure of arterial CO2 or PaCO2 ?45 mmHg at sea level), after excluding other causes for hypoventilation.

Studies have estimated that 8-20 percent of obese patients with sleep apnea have this potentially life-threatening condition. According to the authors of the guideline, most patients with OHS are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed, jeopardizing their health and resulting in increased health care costs.

"The purpose of the guideline is to improve early recognition of OHS and advise clinicians concerning the management of OHS, with the goal of reducing variability in clinical practice and optimizing the evaluation and management of patients with OHS," said guideline panel chair Babak Mokhlesi, MD, MSc, a pulmonologist and a sleep specialist who is a professor of medicine and director of the Sleep Disorders Center and the Sleep Medicine Fellowship training program at the University of Chicago. "The panel believes that early recognition and effective treatment of OHS are important in improving morbidity and mortality."

The panel of 18 experts who produced the guideline included pulmonologists with expertise in sleep-disordered breathing, sleep specialists, a respiratory therapist, a critical care physician, a pulmonary hypertension specialist, an expert in weight reduction and a patient. The group reviewed the results of a systematic search of clinically relevant questions and focused on patient-centered outcomes, such as improving quality of life and quality of sleep, daytime sleepiness, gas exchange, need for supplemental oxygen, hospital resource utilization and death.

Using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) framework, the panel made five recommendations:All the recommendations were deemed "conditional" by the panel because of the "very low level of certainty in the evidence."

The authors of the guideline noted several opportunities for research that they believe would benefit patients with OHS. Randomized trials, they wrote, are needed to determine which is better for screening obese patients with sleep-disordered breathing for OHS: measuring bicarbonate levels or oxygen saturation.

Studies are also needed to evaluate the impact of various PAP modes in OHS patients who do not have severe obstructive sleep apnea, whether patients suspected of OHS but discharged from the hospital without a diagnosis should continue on PAP treatment until an outpatient study confirms or rules out OHS and which bariatric weight-loss interventions are most effective in patients with OHS.

The panel emphasized that clinicians caring for these patients should consider severe obesity a major, modifiable factor in the development and severity of OHS. Clinicians need to educate their patients and engage in shared decision making about the best strategy for their patients to sustain weight loss of at least 25-30 percent, which the authors said is needed to resolve OHS.

In making its recommendations, the panel aimed for guidelines that could be used internationally. The authors recognize, however, that local resources may guide decisions within the framework on the panel's recommendation.

The authors emphasized that each patient is different, medically and personally. "No recommendation can take into account all of the variable and often compelling circumstances that might affect the potential benefits, harms and burdens of an intervention in specific cases and contexts," they wrote. Therefore, the guidelines should not be applied "in a blanket fashion."
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"American Thoracic Society clinical guideline on #obesity hypoventilation syndrome makes recommendations to improve care in patients with #OHS, a life-threatening condition that the experts of the @atscommunity document say can be resolved by sustained #weightloss of 25% or more. @atscommunity @ATSBlueEditor"

About the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

The AJRCCM is a peer-reviewed journal published by the American Thoracic Society. The Journal takes pride in publishing the most innovative science and the highest quality reviews, practice guidelines and statements in pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine. With an impact factor of 16.494, it is one of the highest ranked journals in pulmonology. Editor: Jadwiga Wedzicha, MD, professor of respiratory medicine at the National Heart and Lung Institute (Royal Brompton Campus), Imperial College London, UK.

About the American Thoracic Society

Founded in 1905, the American Thoracic Society is the world's leading medical association dedicated to advancing pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine. The Society's 15,000 members prevent and fight respiratory disease around the globe through research, education, patient care and advocacy. The ATS publishes three journals, the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology and the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

The ATS will hold its 2020 International Conference, May 15-20, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where world-renowned experts will share the latest scientific research and clinical advances in pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine.

American Thoracic Society

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