Febs Lecture Course On "Lipid Signals"

August 01, 1997

FEBS and Consorzio Mario Negri Sud Lecture Course On "Lipid Signals"


FEBS Advanced Course


The CMNS, Consorzio Mario Negri Sud, will host a FEBS Lecture Course on "Lipid Signals"
Santa Maria Imbaro (Chieti) Italy
19-24 September 1997
Mario Negri Sud Institute


Contact: Cinzia Di Sebastiano
Dept. of Cell Biology and Oncology
cinzia@cmns.mnegri.it
+39 872 570338
Consorzio Mario Negri Sud
Organizers: Daniela Corda (I), Gerry T. Snoek (NL) and Alberto Luini (I)


Topics include:
  • Lipid metabolism and traffic
  • Lipid kinases, PTPases and PI Transfer proteins
  • Inositol phosphates, calcium and diacylglycerol
  • Lipids in the structure and dynamics of organelles



The list of lecturers includes:
  • V. A. Bankaitis (USA)
  • L. Cocco (I)
  • S. Cockcroft (UK)
  • M. A. De Matteis (I)
  • C.C. Leslie (USA)
  • P. Gierschik (FRG)
  • P. Hawkins (UK)
  • M. Liscovitch (IL)
  • R. H. Michell (UK)
  • D. Mochly-Rosen (USA)
  • W. H. Moolenaar (NL)
  • F. Paltauf (A)
  • T. Pozzan (I)
  • M. Shinitzky (IL)
  • G. Van Meer (NL)
  • R. F. A. Zwaal (NL)



Registration fee:

650 DM ($425.00) (accomodation included)
(max 80 participants)


Fellowships from the FEBS Youth Travel Fund:


Participants under the age of 31 can apply (deadline has been postponed to August 7) for a grant to defray part of their expenses. Forms will be supplied to eligible applicants upon request.


Send enquiries abstracts and application to:

Ms. Cinzia Di Sebastiano
Department of Cell Biology and Oncology
Consorzio Mario Negri Sud
Via Nazionale
66030 Santa Maria Imbaro (Chieti) Italy
Phone: ++39-872-570338 Fax: ++39-872-578240


For more information:http://www.cmns.mnegri.it/it/seminari/febs_wel.html


Consorzio Mario Negri Sud

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