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OUP launches new infectious diseases journal with the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

August 02, 2011

Oxford University Press (OUP) will partner with the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS) to publish the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (JPIDS).

This new quarterly journal will be edited by Theoklis E. Zaoutis, MD, MSCE, Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and will be dedicated to perinatal, childhood, and adolescent infectious diseases. It will be a high-quality source of original research articles, clinical trial reports, guidelines, and topical reviews in an essential publication that will span from bench to bedside.

PIDS President, Janet A. Englund, MD, Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Washington said: "The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society is very excited about our new journal that will reflect the broad interests of our society and our society's goal of treating and preventing infections in children. We look forward to sharing our research, guidelines, and innovation with colleagues both in this country and internationally."

The title will further strengthen OUP's publishing program in the area of infectious diseases, dedicating particular attention to the interests and needs of the pediatric infectious diseases community.

Niko Pfund, President of Oxford University Press, Inc., said: "This partnership reflects OUP's continued desire to build alliances with leading societies and will enable us to offer a complete infectious disease research resource via our journal collection. We look forward to working with the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society to create a strong new title in this subject area."

JPIDS will publish its first print and online issue in March 2012. All members of PIDS will receive an online and print subscription to JPIDS as part of their membership. There will be an option for subscribers to purchase it with the Infectious Diseases Society of America journals, Journal of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Infectious Diseases, which also are published by OUP.
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For more information, please contact:
Lizzie Shannon-Little
Brand & Communications Assistant Manager
Oxford University Press
lizzie.shannonlittle@oup.com
+44 (0)1865 353043

Notes to editors

Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford. It furthers the University's objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education by publishing worldwide. OUP is the world's largest university press with the widest global presence. It currently publishes more than 6,000 new publications a year, has offices in around fifty countries, and employs more than 5,500 people worldwide. It has become familiar to millions through a diverse publishing program that includes scholarly works in all academic disciplines, bibles, music, school and college textbooks, children's books, materials for teaching English as a foreign language, business books, dictionaries and reference books, and academic journals. Read more about OUP.

PIDS, see http://www.pids.org/, is a membership organization of over 1,000 specialists in pediatric infectious diseases, covering areas from basic and clinical research to patient care. PIDS' mission is to enhance the health of infants, children, and adolescents by promoting excellence in diagnosis, management, and prevention of infectious diseases through clinical care, education, research, and advocacy. PIDS represents the leading practitioners, policy-makers, and researchers who work with children's infectious diseases.

Oxford University Press

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