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Seabirds are threatened by hazardous chemicals in plastics

August 02, 2019

An international collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) , Japan, has found that hazardous chemicals were detected in plastics eaten by seabirds. This suggests that the seabird has been threatened by these chemicals once they eat plastics.

The research findings were published in Marine Pollution Bulletin in May 2019.

The researchers carried out non-target survey of additives in 194 pieces of plastics ingested by seabirds, such as Northern Fulmar and Albatross. These additives, which are often hazardous chemicals, are generally blended into most plastics in order to make plastics better, for instance to stabilize polymers against UV degradation or oxidation, to simply add colors, and so on.

"We uncovered that 4 kinds of UV stabilizers and 2 brominated flame retardants at detection frequencies of 4.6% and 2.1%, respectively" said Dr. Hideshige Takada, the corresponding author and professor in the Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry of TUAT. "Our previous researches showed that these additives in plastics are transferred from ingested plastics and unfortunately accumulated in some tissues of seabirds."

"These findings imply that any of these additives can be detected in the tissue of seabirds which ingest 15 pieces of plastics with probability of 73%. We found that ingestion of 15 pieces of plastics per one individual is actually happening in the real-world case of the Albatross.", said Dr. Takada. "We could foresee in the near future that 90 % of the individuals would accumulate additives derived from ingested plastics if the number would increase double, that is 30 pieces per individual."

The present study was supported by a Grant-in-Aid from the Ministry of Education and Culture of Japan (Projects No. 26-8120 and No. 16H01768) and Environment Research and Technology Development Fund (SII-2-2).
-end-
For information about the Takada laboratory, please visit http://web.tuat.ac.jp/~gaia/english/english.html

Original publication

Piece-by-piece analysis of additives and manufacturing byproducts in plastics ingested by seabirds: Implication for risk of exposure to seabirds. Kosuke Tanaka, Jan A. van Franeker, Tomohiro Deguchi, Hideshige Takada. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 145 (2019) 36-41 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2019.05.028

About Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology

Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) is a distinguished university in Japan dedicated to science and technology. TUAT focuses on agriculture and engineering that form the foundation of industry, and promotes education and research fields that incorporate them. Boasting a history of over 140 years since our founding in 1874, TUAT continues to boldly take on new challenges and steadily promote fields. For more information, please visit http://www.tuat.ac.jp/en/.

Contact

Hideshige Takada, Ph.D.
Professor,
Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry (LOG),
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan
e-mail: shige@cc.tuat.ac.jp

Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology

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