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Leading cancer research organizations to host international cancer immunotherapy conference

August 03, 2015

NEW YORK - The Cancer Research Institute (CRI), the Association for Cancer Immunotherapy (CIMT), the European Academy of Tumor Immunology (EATI), and the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) will join forces to sponsor the first International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference at the Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel in New York, Sept. 16-19, 2015.

Titled "Translating Science into Survival," the meeting will cover all areas of inquiry in cancer immunology and immunotherapy, including: immune regulation of T-cell responsiveness, genomic methods for identifying tumor antigens, the tumor microenvironment, T-cell therapies, checkpoint blockade, biomarkers, combinations, and the microbiome. More than 60 talks by acknowledged leaders in these areas will be given.

The full program is available here: http://www.aacr.org/Meetings/Pages/Program-Detail.aspx?EventItemID=54&ItemID=149.

Registration is complimentary for credentialed news media. Members of the media can register using this form: http://www.aacr.org/Documents/15Immuno_RegForm.pdf. Return completed forms to Lauren Riley via email at lauren.riley@aacr.org or via fax at 215-446-7291.

Public information officers at medical institutes and cancer centers can also register by contacting Lauren Riley at lauren.riley@aacr.org or 215-446-7155.

Those following on social media can join the conversation on Twitter at #cicon15.
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For more information, contact Julia Gunther at julia.gunther@aacr.org or 267-250-5441, or Jeff Molter at jeff.molter@aacr.org or 267-210-3965.

American Association for Cancer Research

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