Nav: Home

Leading cancer research organizations to host international cancer immunotherapy conference

August 03, 2015

NEW YORK - The Cancer Research Institute (CRI), the Association for Cancer Immunotherapy (CIMT), the European Academy of Tumor Immunology (EATI), and the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) will join forces to sponsor the first International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference at the Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel in New York, Sept. 16-19, 2015.

Titled "Translating Science into Survival," the meeting will cover all areas of inquiry in cancer immunology and immunotherapy, including: immune regulation of T-cell responsiveness, genomic methods for identifying tumor antigens, the tumor microenvironment, T-cell therapies, checkpoint blockade, biomarkers, combinations, and the microbiome. More than 60 talks by acknowledged leaders in these areas will be given.

The full program is available here: http://www.aacr.org/Meetings/Pages/Program-Detail.aspx?EventItemID=54&ItemID=149.

Registration is complimentary for credentialed news media. Members of the media can register using this form: http://www.aacr.org/Documents/15Immuno_RegForm.pdf. Return completed forms to Lauren Riley via email at lauren.riley@aacr.org or via fax at 215-446-7291.

Public information officers at medical institutes and cancer centers can also register by contacting Lauren Riley at lauren.riley@aacr.org or 215-446-7155.

Those following on social media can join the conversation on Twitter at #cicon15.
-end-
For more information, contact Julia Gunther at julia.gunther@aacr.org or 267-250-5441, or Jeff Molter at jeff.molter@aacr.org or 267-210-3965.

American Association for Cancer Research

Related Immunotherapy Articles:

Barrier Proteins in Tumors are Possible Key to Immunotherapy Success
By comparing variations in protein expression in tumor samples from a single melanoma patient, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute and the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center say their findings have the potential to reveal some of the mechanisms underlying response or resistance to immunotherapy drugs.
Discovery could guide immunotherapy for lung cancer
Scientists have discovered a new type of immune cell that could predict which lung cancer patients will benefit most from immunotherapy treatment, according to a Cancer Research UK funded study* published today (Monday) in Nature Immunotherapy.
Genetic mutations predict patient response to immunotherapy
Results of a new clinical study establish particular genetic defects in tumors as clinical indicators for successful response to a type of immunotherapy called PD-1 blockade.
'Immunoswitch' particles may be key to more-effective cancer immunotherapy
Scientists at Johns Hopkins have created a nanoparticle that carries two different antibodies capable of simultaneously switching off cancer cells' defensive properties while switching on a robust anticancer immune response in mice.
Early research suggests first immunotherapy for mesothelioma on the horizon
Malignant pleural mesothelioma or MPM is a rare cancer, but its incidence has been rising.
A new T-cell population for cancer immunotherapy
Scientists at the University of Basel in Switzerland have, for the first time, described a new T cell population that can recognize and kill tumor cells.
Immunotherapy target suppresses pain to mask cancer
Duke University researchers found that a molecule called PD-L1, which is blocked by the immunotherapy drug nivolumab, acts not only on immune cells but also on the nerve cells that signal pain.
Immunotherapy against bee stings in some cases incomplete
The preparations that are used for allergen immunotherapy against bee sting allergies do not always contain all the relevant venom components.
New imaging method may predict immunotherapy response early
A noninvasive PET imaging method that measures granzyme B, a protein released by immune cells to kill cancer cells, was able to distinguish mouse and human tumors that responded to immune checkpoint inhibitors from those that did not respond early in the course of treatment.
T cell revival correlates with lung cancer response to PD-1 immunotherapy
In lung cancer patients who were taking immunotherapy drugs targeting the PD-1 pathway, testing for CD8 T cell activation in their blood partially predicted whether their tumors would shrink.

Related Immunotherapy Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Changing The World
What does it take to change the world for the better? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on activism—what motivates it, why it matters, and how each of us can make a difference. Guests include civil rights activist Ruby Sales, labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, author Jeremy Heimans, "craftivist" Sarah Corbett, and designer and futurist Angela Oguntala.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#521 The Curious Life of Krill
Krill may be one of the most abundant forms of life on our planet... but it turns out we don't know that much about them. For a create that underpins a massive ocean ecosystem and lives in our oceans in massive numbers, they're surprisingly difficult to study. We sit down and shine some light on these underappreciated crustaceans with Stephen Nicol, Adjunct Professor at the University of Tasmania, Scientific Advisor to the Association of Responsible Krill Harvesting Companies, and author of the book "The Curious Life of Krill: A Conservation Story from the Bottom of the World".