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Microscope imaging system integrates virtual reality technology

August 03, 2016

Joshua Bederson, MD, Professor and System Chair for the Department of Neurosurgery at Mount Sinai Health System, is the first neurosurgeon to use CaptiView - a microscope image injection system from Leica Microsystems that overlays critical virtual reality imaging directly onto the brain when viewed through the eyepiece, known as the ocular, during surgery. This new microscope technology allows images of chosen objects, including original CT, MRI and angiogram datasets, to be superimposed, or 'injected,' directly into the neurosurgeon's eyepiece during microscopic surgery.

"This next-generation augmented virtual reality tool provides real-time information in ways never before realized," says Dr. Bederson, who is now using the technology for all of his cases. He worked closely with Leica Microsystems and Brainlab® to develop the surgical navigation tool.

The CaptiView image injection system utilizes Brainlab® Cranial 3.1 Navigation Software in conjunction with a Leica M530 OH6 microscope. The heads-up display provides neurovascular and fiber-track information in 2D or 3D as well as on-screen video overlays visible through the ocular. The microscope integration also allows the surgeon to switch views in the eyepiece, toggling between live and pre-operative anatomical images using handle control buttons or footswitch for ease of use and uninterrupted workflow. Markers attached to the microscope enable positional tracking and autofocus.

This new technology will be utilized alongside Surgical Navigation Advanced Platform (SNAP) developed by Surgical Theater, LLC, which is a standard feature in the operating room. SNAP provides advanced 3D visualization technology that gives surgeons an intraoperative and patient-specific 3D environment to plan and understand surgical approaches.

"We are driving and advancing the development of next-generation simulation and virtual reality technology, which can help improve patient outcomes and solve neurosurgical challenges," says Dr. Bederson.

Dr. Bederson is an expert in skull-base and cerebrovascular surgery and has performed more than 3,600 neurosurgical operations at Mount Sinai. Dr. Bederson owns equity in Surgical Theater, LLC.
-end-
About the Mount Sinai Health System

The Mount Sinai Health System is an integrated health system committed to providing distinguished care, conducting transformative research, and advancing biomedical education. Structured around seven hospital campuses and a single medical school, the Health System has an extensive ambulatory network and a range of inpatient and outpatient services--from community-based facilities to tertiary and quaternary care.

The System includes approximately 7,000 primary and specialty care physicians; 12 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 140 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the renowned Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the highest in the nation in National Institutes of Health funding per investigator. The Mount Sinai Hospital is ranked as one of the nation's top 10 hospitals in Geriatrics, Cardiology/Heart Surgery, and Gastroenterology, and is in the top 25 in five other specialties in the 2014-2015 "Best Hospitals" issue of U.S. News & World Report. Mount Sinai's Kravis Children's Hospital also is ranked in seven out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News & World Report. The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked 11th nationally for Ophthalmology, while Mount Sinai Beth Israel is ranked regionally.

For more information, visit http://www.mountsinai.org/, or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

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