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The chemistry of Yellowstone's hot springs (video)

August 03, 2018

WASHINGTON, Aug. 3, 2018 -- Yellowstone National Park is a popular destination for vacationers and nature lovers. But if you don't obey the park's rules and regulations, you could end up in off-limits areas where the water is dangerous because of its acidity and extreme heat. In this video, Reactions explains how Yellowstone's geochemistry leads to its unique waters: https://youtu.be/OqP50563IDM.
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Reactions is a video series produced by the American Chemical Society and PBS Digital Studios. Subscribe to Reactions at http://bit.ly/ACSReactions, and follow us on Twitter @ACSreactions.

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