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What role do inflammatory cytokines play in creating T cell exhaustion in cancer?

August 03, 2018

New Rochelle, NY, Aug. 3, 2018--A better understanding of the role secreted inflammatory cytokines play in the tumor microenvironment that results in the differentiation of effector T cells into exhausted T cells points to possible approaches to improve the antitumor activity of T cells and to intervene in T cell exhaustion. A new article exploring the expression patterns of inflammatory cytokines in tumor tissues and the blood of cancer patients and seeking to understand how exhausted T cells lose their antitumor properties is published in Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers . The article is available free on the Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals website through September 3, 2018.

In the review article, "The Role of Inflammatory Cytokines in Creating T Cell Exhaustion in Cancer," Hedayatollah Shirzad and colleagues from Shahrekord University, Shahrekord, Iran report on multiple studies that illustrate a direct role for inflammatory cytokines in the creation of cell exhaustion through multiple pathways. The researchers recommend a greater focus on efforts to reprogram exhausted T cells in the early stages and alternatively, therapeutic interventions such as anti-inflammation therapy.

"Clearly there is room and need for further understanding of the role and functional consequences of exhausted T cells as they relate to impacting on the immune system, how that interplays with outcomes in cancer therapies, and how advantages might be taken to improve existing therapeutic strategies," says Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals Editor-in-Chief Martin W. Brechbiel, PhD.

About the Journal

Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals," published 10 times per year in print and online, is the only peer-reviewed journal with a specific focus on cancer biotherapy, including monoclonal antibodies, cytokine therapy, cancer gene therapy, cell-based therapies, and other forms of immunotherapy. Led by Editor-in-Chief Martin W. Brechbiel, PhD, the Journal includes extensive reporting on advancements in radioimmunotherapy and the use of radiopharmaceuticals and radiolabeled peptides for the development of new cancer treatments. Tables of content and a sample issue can be viewed on the Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research, Human Gene Therapy, and Stem Cells and Development. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.
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Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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