Aug. 11 symposium on war US nuclear strategy after the Cold War

August 04, 2004

The National Academy of Sciences' Committee on International Security and Arms Control will host a public symposium to discuss how the United States should manage its nuclear arsenal in the post-Cold War world.

Three keynote speakers will offer their perspectives on U.S. nuclear weapons policy: William J. Perry, former secretary of defense, Rep. David Hobson (R-Ohio), and Linton Brooks, undersecretary of energy for nuclear security, U.S. Department of Energy. Panel discussions will focus on topics such as the need for earth-penetrating nuclear weapons, the role of nuclear weapons in U.S. foreign policy, and the Stockpile Stewardship Program, a DOE effort to safely maintain the nation's nuclear arsenal and to use simulated tests to measure its reliability.

SYMPOSIUM DETAILS:
Wednesday, Aug. 11, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. EDT, in the auditorium of the National Academies building, 2100 C St., N.W., Washington, D.C. This event will NOT be webcast. An agenda is available online at http://www7.nationalacademies.org/cisac/index.html.

REPORTERS: REGISTER TO ATTEND by contacting the Office of News and Public Information at tel. 202-334-2138 or e-mail news@nas.edu.
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National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

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