Nav: Home

New analytical tool for fluorescence detection of double-stranded RNA

August 04, 2016

Ribonucleic acid (RNA) binding fluorescent probes have been powerful and important analytical tools for the study of RNA structures and functions.

A research group led by Professor Seiichi Nishizawa at Tohoku University's Graduate School of Science has reported a new RNA probe that binds to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in a sequence-specific manner.

A fluorescent dye, thiazole orange (TO), is added to peptide nucleic acid (PNA). The probe exhibits a remarkable light-up response upon binding to the dsRNA by triplex formation (Figure 1).

The probe has a weak response to mismatch-containing dsRNA sequences, thus enabling sequence-selective fluorescence sensing of dsRNA at the single-base pair resolution. It also shows a preference for binding with dsRNA over dsDNA, which is an important selective process for future applications in a cellular environment where RNA and DNA co-exist.

In contrast to the conventional analytical method which is limited to single-stranded regions of RNA, the new analytical method allows for fluorescent sensing of target dsRNA structure and sequence for the first time.

It is expected that the probe will open up new possibilities for analyzing the functions of dsRNA-containing structures, which are closely related to various biological phenomena and diseases.
-end-


Tohoku University

Related Dna Articles:

Penn State DNA ladders: Inexpensive molecular rulers for DNA research
New license-free tools will allow researchers to estimate the size of DNA fragments for a fraction of the cost of currently available methods.
It is easier for a DNA knot...
How can long DNA filaments, which have convoluted and highly knotted structure, manage to pass through the tiny pores of biological systems?
How do metals interact with DNA?
Since a couple of decades, metal-containing drugs have been successfully used to fight against certain types of cancer.
Electrons use DNA like a wire for signaling DNA replication
A Caltech-led study has shown that the electrical wire-like behavior of DNA is involved in the molecule's replication.
Switched-on DNA
DNA, the stuff of life, may very well also pack quite the jolt for engineers trying to advance the development of tiny, low-cost electronic devices.
Researchers are first to see DNA 'blink'
Northwestern University biomedical engineers have developed imaging technology that is the first to see DNA 'blink,' or fluoresce.
Finding our way around DNA
A Salk team developed a tool that maps functional areas of the genome to better understand disease.
A 'strand' of DNA as never before
In a carefully designed polymer, researchers at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences have imprinted a sequence of a single strand of DNA.
Doubling down on DNA
The African clawed frog X. laevis genome contains two full sets of chromosomes from two extinct ancestors.
'Poring over' DNA
Church's team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard Medical School developed a new electronic DNA sequencing platform based on biologically engineered nanopores that could help overcome present limitations.

Related Dna Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#530 Why Aren't We Dead Yet?
We only notice our immune systems when they aren't working properly, or when they're under attack. How does our immune system understand what bits of us are us, and what bits are invading germs and viruses? How different are human immune systems from the immune systems of other creatures? And is the immune system so often the target of sketchy medical advice? Those questions and more, this week in our conversation with author Idan Ben-Barak about his book "Why Aren't We Dead Yet?: The Survivor’s Guide to the Immune System".